takkk
Lv 4
takkk asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 month ago

Native English speakers: Is it possible to use "in two years" instead of "for the first time in two years"?

I saw a sentence in which "in two years" is used, meaning "for the first time in two years," and looking for the sentence, but I can't find it. Do you think it possible to use "in two years" in the same meaning as "for the first time in two years"? If you come up with an example, would you share it with me?

I should have written the sentence down. 

8 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favourite answer

    I'm sorry, but as you rightly said yourself, you should have written the sentence down. It's quite possible that in that specific sentence the phrase "in two years" might be perfectly OK.

    If you find it, post again.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    No. 

    There is far deeper meaning to the statement, with the use of "for the first time" included.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Not enough information.

  • Ben
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Might you be confusing this with using a negative + "in two years"? That usually does mean the name as "for the first time in two years."

    For example:

    "This has not happened in two years."

    and

    "This has happened for the first time in two years."

    Mean roughly the same thing. 

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  • 1 month ago

    I don't think it is a good idea.

    "In two years, she has not once visited the library." is awkward.

    "In her two years at school, she has not once visited the library." So it can work, but it needs a subject.

    "In two years time, she will graduate." also works. 

    So in isolation it doesn't work.

  • 1 month ago

    I do not think it is possible to use "in two years" to mean "for the first time in two years."

    The phrase "for the first time in two years" means that something happened that hadn't happened since two years earlier. "He took a vacation for the first time in two years."

    By itself "in two years" usually means "two years from now." "He will graduate in two years."

  • 1 month ago

    I don't think it's possible, although I'm not certain.  I can't think of any examples where they would mean the same thing.

  • 1 month ago

    It has different meanings:

    1) In two years, unemployment has increased

    2) In the last 2 years, unemployment has increased.

    The 2nd sentence is much more specific. if you just say 'in two years,' it raises more questions. A person might wonder: was it within the last 2 years that unemployment increased or sometime in the distant past?

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