Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceOther - Business & Finance · 1 month ago

Should it be illegal for restaurants to charge a fee for food delivery?

Some call it a service fee or restaurant preparation fee.  If I walk in their is no fee so why should their be a fee for making the food just because someone else is coming to pick it up.  I am already paying for the food and the delivery driver a tip.  

13 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    " there ".

    Here's another option, learn how to cook ...

  • 4 weeks ago

    Restaurants are fooling you: Customers can refuse to pay ‘service charge’, never mind the signboard

    Restaurants are fooling you: Customers can refuse to pay ‘service charge’, never mind the signboard

    Many restaurants are still adding the service charge between 5% and 20% in the bill without customers' consent. Notably, as many as 36% of the consumers end up paying the service charge unknowingly.

    Restaurants are fooling you: Customers can refuse to pay 'service charge', never mind the signboard

    X

    ‘It is totally up to the consumer to pay, or not pay, or by how much, and only if they like the service.’ (Image: IE)

    A year ago, the Consumer Affairs Ministry clarified that the ‘service charge’ levied by restaurants and hotels is “voluntary” and customers can refuse to pay it altogether or pay only to the extent they wish to pay. Yet, many restaurants are still adding the service charge between 5% and 20% in the bill without customers’ consent. Notably, as many as 36% of the consumers end up paying the service charge unknowingly, while only 10% get it removed, a survey shows.

    What the government said was a directive and not a law; so it is not totally illegal for restaurants to add the service charge in the bill. However, if you decide to stand up and get it removed from the bill, they cannot refuse.

    In many cases, some restaurants put up a signboard or a disclaimer on the menu that they ‘levy service charge’, in order to be able to refuse customers’ request. But, even in such cases, customers have the right to not pay the service charge, a Consumer Affairs Ministry official told FE Online pointing to the last year’s guidelines.

    “Many restaurants are still adding a service charge in the bill and forcing the customers to pay it,” a survey conducted by LocalCircles said. While the number of people who are not paying this service charge is increasing month-on-month but still is very low. A survey of 8,013 consumers showed that as many as 36% did not know that they were paying for service charge as well in the final bill amount and about 27% paid them anyway.

    “Many consumers don’t want to pick a fight where they have gone with family to have a good time, so they just pay it. It’s sad that despite clear directive, there could still be a fight or heated argument. I think once the new Consumer Protection Bill is passed, there will be more clarity,” Sachin Taparia of LocalCircles said.

    “It is totally up to the consumer to pay, or not pay, or by how much, and only if they like the service. And right now, more awareness is required,” he added.

    What Consumer Affairs Ministry guideline says:

    It’s your choice. The guideline clearly mentioned that a consumer will be in a position to take the decision whether or not he/she is willing to pay the service charge only after availing the service. The assumption that the entry of a consumer into a restaurant amounts to consent to pay the service charge is “not correct”.

    It also said that a customer is liable to pay only the prices displayed on the menu card along with applicable taxes. Any other charge besides these without “consent” is unfair trade practice.

    The price of a product (food) covers both goods and service components.

  • 1 month ago

    I don't think so. They have to spend money on this.

  • It shouldn't be illegal. the restaurant can include delivery charges with the base price of the food and then brand it as free delivery for that perticular item. 

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  • John
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    The answer is no.  When you order delivery, you are choosing an extra service.  A business has the right to charge for additional services ordered by customers.  

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Illegal? You're a freaking moron.  Its easy enough to just choose not to use those services.

  • 1 month ago

    The delivery service takes more money from the restaurant than you see on the line item.  Delivery is actually bad business for a lot of places who use grubhub or ubereats.  

    I have no idea why one would say this should be illegal.  Nothing is hidden.  Either you're willing to pay it or not.  If not, then get off your butt and go get your food.  I have no idea why you tip a driver up front.  Tips are 100% based on service.  They always have been.  If you want to pay them something up front, then call it a bribe for doing their job.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Because they have to buy containers and manage other logistics to ******* make it ready for you.

  • 1 month ago

    No, its shouldn't be illegal. The government should stay out of it.

    Business owners should be free to run their business however they choose. If they want to charge an extra fee for an extra service that's their right.

    As a customer you also have freedom of choice. You can choose not to pay the extra fee and instead you pick up the food yourself. Or you can choose not to do business with them at all if you don't like their pricing. You can make food at home or buy from another restaurant.

    but business should not be required by law to deliver your food at no extra charge.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Because tips are voluntary.

    No it shouldn't be illegal.  The restaurant has to pay their employee to drive the food to your home whether you tip or not.   If the driver is self-employed (Uber, etc.), they don't get paid at all if you don't tip.    I see no reason anyone should be obligated to work for free without any guarantee of at least a minimum payment for the labor provided.

    Personally, I'd rather see a set delivery fee and get rid of tipping altogether for delivery. 

    This business of charging a delivery fee AND expecting a tip...really not a fan of that.   By the time the delivery fee and tip comes to more than $10-15, I'm more motivated to eat something from my own pantry or put my butt in the car. 

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