Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingAdolescent · 2 months ago

What age should sex ed be mandatory- if at all? ?

I think it should be mandatory sometime before the kid reaches high school level. What's the point in teaching teens about their "changing bodies" if many of them have already started- if not finished with the hardest part of their development?

My sister, however, thinks it should be up to the parents to provide sex ed to the kids- not the schools (I personally don't think you could hold most parents up to this level of responsibility). I wanna know what other people think.

15 Answers

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Since it seems obvious that some parents do not provide sex and relationship guidance, it is obvious that 'someone' must provide it, and that usually means the school system in most western countries.  'Changing bodies' and sniggering about breasts behind the bike sheds does not provide a good basis for learning how to handle yourself in society, so sex and relationship education should start quite young, maybe 8 or 9, especially as it seems that many youngsters of that age have already viewed porn.

    Questions and answers on this site show that many people reach adulthood without knowing the basics about sex etc.

  • 1 month ago

    Of course it should be mandatory, and it needs to start at a very young age. 

    Small kids need to understand their bodies, proper names for body parts and that it isn't allowed for everyone to touch them, especially someone who is molesting them. They need to know that they have the right to have that stop, and that they CAN tell their parents and not be in trouble.

    As kids get older the information needs to become more in depth so that when their body changes they are prepared for it. And there needs to always be open, honest and truthful communication so that the child will always trust that they can speak about what is on their mind. And this needs to includen open, loving and honest conversations about gender, and if they have questions regarding LGBTQ+ and if they feel they may questioning their sexual identity.

    They also need to learn the hard facts regarding teen pregnancy. Giving them a doll to tend is fine, but they need to learn a lot more about underage parenthood like how much that child is actually going to cost, what a teen parents school and job prospects will look like, how much the grandparents will inevitably end up paying and how much their lives will be disrupted. 

    This whole conversation needs to be made way more relevant to today's society. We are still looking at it through 1950's eyes.

  • God
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Let them get their sex education like we did, piece by piece.

  • 1 month ago

    It's the parent's job. They should teach their children about sex around age 9-12.

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  • 2 months ago

    Parents who think children shouldn't know anything about sex until high school don't live on farms.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Comprehensive sex education needs to start the moment kids enter school, and continue all the way through high school. And by comprehensive, I am not just talking about classes in biology and the mechanics of sex, either. I'm talking about the desperate need that we have in this country for classes that teach kids about RELATIONSHIPS, and how to handle specific social and sexual situations such as dating, and how to avoid becoming victims of date rape and sexual assaults.  Said classes would also teach kids about how to handle PEER PRESSURE, and how to respond to issues like BULLYING in constructive, positive ways. There is so much more to teaching sex ed than just focusing on "inserting Tab A into Slot B" types of classes. Comprehensive sex ed classes also need to include segments on personal responsibility, and why teenage pregnancy is a disaster for all parties involved in it. There should be a discussion of sexually transmitted diseases, too, and how to prevent them. And ALL kids need to know about contraception and how and where to buy things like condoms. That's just basic common sense. Incidentally, if more kids were taught sex ed in a comprehensive manner that was free from religious interference, the overall rates of teen pregnancy and abortion would DROP significantly. The best way to eliminate the need for abortion, folks, is to eliminate the REAL CAUSE of the problem- the unwanted, unplanned pregnancies that LEAD TO IT in the first place ! If we had more sex ed, and more and better methods of contraception, and they were more widely available, we could completely ELIMINATE the NEED for abortion, except in extreme, rare circumstances. That alone is one very valid argument for having comprehensive sex ed in schools. Knowing about sex DOES NOT encourage kids to try it themselves, a fact which has been well proven through decades of clinical research.

    Your sis may CLAIM that she wants to teach her kids about sex, but I suspect that if you were to ask her if she's comfortable with the idea of talking to her kids about this subject, her response is likely to be "Hell, NO!" MOST parents, particularly parents who are older, are usually very squeamish about the idea of talking about sex in front of their kids. Why do you think that schools have issues with girls getting pregnant? It's not rocket science. The girls(and guys) don't learn what they should, when they need to learn it, so they end up getting information from their buddies or from the movies, TV, or the Web- and most of what they learn is WRONG. And since our mass media is FULL of sexual images and sexually explicit material, it's not an accident that the kids think it's okay to try such behaviors themselves.

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Sexual education is a mandatory expressly bit for either both, or one of the parents at the first signs of courious touching.

  • edward
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I went to a catholic private school so the policy of course was abstinence but the choices the school made regarding education was up to the people on the board.  Sex ed was lightly touched on in grade 7-8 and health classes grades 9-12 where it is manditory, to be honest i almost failed every test in sex ed we had.  Not to say i wasn’t already having sex and not to say i wasn’t being safe i was just a bad student in health class

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I wouldn't say mandatory but sadly many parents including my own didn't talk to me much about sex or puberty. I learned about it in 6th grade and learned some more in highschool. If the school didn't teach me then I would have been clueless about many things. I thankful school taught me. 

    But in the end I do feel it is up to the parents to educate their kids on things like this. 

  • 2 months ago

    Schools should NOT be teaching sex education at all - that is the duty and responsibility of the parents! 

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