Turned in a 60day notice to move but found out you still have to pay the reminder months left in lease so can you still stay or have to go?

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  • 1 month ago

    I'm sure your landlord would be more than happy to allow you to finish out the term of your lease by staying until it was up. 

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  • 1 month ago

    What would be the point of a lease if you were not bound by the terms and conditions of it?  Regardless, if you want to rescind your notice, you will have to ask your landlord.  It's up to them.  If they already re-rented it, then it will not be possible, but you won't have to pay the months that someone else is paying.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Landlord & Tenant law experience.
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  • G R
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You're kidding right?  You have until the last day stated in your lease. YES you can stay, all you did was give the landlord notice of your intentions to move out so they can start trying to get a new tenant.

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  • 1 month ago

    Correct.  You cannot leave a lease early with no consiquences. If there is no lease break fee stated in the lease then you can be charged rent through the end of the lease or until they find a new tenant (which ever is less). 

    If you can stay is 100% up to YOUR landlord. They do not have to let you recind your notice.  If they have not re-rented the unit then they may let you recind your notice. Again- that is up to them. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Impossible to answer without seeing your lease.  Sorry.

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  • 1 month ago

    how is it you just  found out?  that is common knowledge that you signed a legal contract and can be held to it.

    how long ago did you turn in notice?  if it was recent, likely the landlord has not found a new tenant...talk to the landlord right away.

    even if a state defaults to 30 days or otherwise less than 60, it is typically legal for a landlord to require 60.

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  • 1 month ago

    Giving a 60 day notice doesn't get you out of a lease with more than two months remaining. Few states require 60 days, and when they do, that is the notice you must give (and the landlord must give) to terminate a tenancy when there is no written lease agreement, or it is the notice period required when a lease will be ending. You are notifying the landlord that you have no interest in renewal or they are notifying you that they are not extending an offer of renewal.

    If you have three or months remaining on a lease, the 60 day notice does NOT legally end your tenancy after 60 days. The landlord cannot physically nor legally force you to stay, but you are legally on the hook for rent for the entire remainder of the lease.

    What giving notice DOES do for you is put the landlord on notice that they need to start looking for someone to replace you with. They can't just let the place sit empty and bill you for the rent. Let's say you want out ASAP but you have six months remaining. You notify them now that you are leaving at the end of July. You owe rent to the end of July, and if they can show that they made a good-faith effort to find a replacement, but that replacement wasn't ready until September 1st, you legally owe for August, too. It doesn't matter that you weren't living there. That is what your lease legally obligates you to.

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  • 1 month ago

    When you put your rented home on notice, you are giving your landlord legal permission to re-rent it based on your out date. The very first thing you need to do is speak with your landlord.

    1. If you intend to stay, retract your notice in writing.

    2. If you still intend to leave, read your lease.

    Your lease may discuss your options for breaking the lease, subletting the home, having the home re-rented, etc. You need to know what those options are before you talk to your landlord.

    Now, let's say you talk to your landlord and they've already pre-leased your home based on your out date. Does your lease have an obligation to vacate clause? Meaning, if your home is re-rented, are you legally required to leave? Does your lease or local tenancy law make mention of collecting double rent? In many areas, you can't legally collect double rent on the same unit. Meaning, if your home was re-rented and someone moves in July 1st, you're only rent-responsible through June 30th. Again, that may not apply to your area, so check your lease and check your laws.

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  • Judith
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I'm amazed that you just "found out" that you are responsible for the rent for the rest of your lease.  Did you even bother to read your lease?  It is a legal document which you signed.  If you signed a one year lease then you are responsible for rent for the period covered by the lease - or for whatever period of time was covered in the lease..

    Go or stay.   Your choice.  Where I live (and I've been a renter since 1964) if a person leaves before the lease is up and they didn't get a waiver from management then they are responsible for the rent until the unit has been re-rented.  Here that would be at least a month since it is a large complex and several units each month must be made ready for occupancy.  Would probably be the same where you live.  

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