Will.
Lv 5
Will. asked in SportsFootballEnglish Football · 8 months ago

Is VAR good or bad.?

In many games this season they have been held up because of petty incidents being decided be VAR. I hope the FA will change the rules for next year to just major incidents. Do you like it and is VAR working for you?.

17 Answers

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  • August
    Lv 6
    8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    The idea is first class but there are too many inconsistencies. Last weekend we cleary saw hand to ball in the box,the ref was right there and he didn't flinch. Although i don't like the idea,i think on this occasion,the ref made HIS mind of the interpretation of the game-a first this season. I also don't like the idea that a players nose triggered the VAR machine. There is still too much snot in the system !   

  • 8 months ago

    Hate VAR. They should go back to before they had it. 

  • F
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    Generally I would say it was good, but we have had many crucial decisions that are obvious on VAR not given esp holding in the box. I can't agree with people who moan about their team's goal being ruled offside because someone elbow  or shoelace were offside. You can't have it's only slightly offside, it either is or isn't.

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Anything which cuts out human error has to be a good thing since the referee and linesmen only see in 2D and often have their view obscured anyway. It also eliminates blatant cheating to a certain extent but to finally eradicate that from the game you would also need something like infra red tech to see whether contact has been made in certain situations and the actual extent of that contact. That is possible but that might well slow the game down even more by increasing the time delays. At the end of the game, you have to ask yourself whether anyone nowadays is forced to endure the agony of watching their side put in a great performance and yet not get a result because of a very clear and obvious error. How many fans have stories of leaving the ground with the words "That should never have been a goal!" or "That should have been a penalty!" ringing in their ears? It also helps the referees to be more popular among the fans who now sing far less derisory songs than ever!?? lol? 

    After making this comment  the early afternoon game has now produced one such moment. I do believe most of us are actually thinking and saying "That should never have been a goal!" 

    Oh well, at least I got that part right.

    lol?

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  • 8 months ago

    It’s great. It was about time they used the same technology like in Rugby. 

  • 8 months ago

    the opinion VARies to be honest, but a VARy good question nonetheless.

    its been okay.  Its working but when its in the hands of an amateur its rendered a joke.

    VAR needs to be totaly and utterly manless.

    it needs to be machine entirely.  Computer.   its still a bloke sitting in a small room looking at various screens and using zoom buttons and a joystick.

    thats ridiculous.

  • 8 months ago

    It's good only if the referee knows when to use it

  • The idea of it is good, the way it's being used is bad. As I've said repeatedly, rugby gets this right- you can hear the VAR/TMO talk to the referee (fans should be able to hear this discussion as it would provide transparency). My issue is with the offside calls; if you need four minutes and it's not "clear" that it is/isn't offsides, stick with the on-field call. I can't stand Man Utd but they were correctly awarded a penalty on Saturday but the fans watching should be able to hear what the VAR official is saying (and what angle(s) he/she is looking at).

  • 8 months ago

    It's a good idea, but it hasn't been used well

  • it's good... why well because despite what you hear some 90%+ of decisions given by VAR are correct,  . because VAR doesn't change decisions it simply allows whoever is judgeing to see events as they unfolded and make more astute and accurate decisions, not like some people who think it should guarantee the correct decision,  that's a total myth, by people who just havn't got a clue of the real practical implications and limititations,  it's not magic..

    I i am adement that given the tech available today, these decisions could and should be made far quicker therefore all but eliminating the frustrating pause and wait there is now which does somewhat diltute the magical moments of scoring goals, this for me is the biggest issue..though still superior to pre VAR,  where so many decisoions were inadvertantly wrongly given..

    Also can anyone answer this,   why is it referee's are in charge of VAR?, why do i ask, well because it is obviously a ref on the field of play and other refs do not want to critizise a fellow ref if at all possible, therefore they don't like to overturn a refs decision and having the ridiculous guide of "obvious mistake" so that they do not make other refs look bad, even though the entire point of VAR was to get decisions correct not just change those that were obviously wrong...in other words there is a distinct conflict of interest..

    So for me ...do not use refs to judge decisions, use someone else either trained dedicated independant workers without any connection to those on the field of play....also more people analysing the live game simultanously so that incidents can be judged much quicker and avoid these pauses, I actually can't understand why a written computer program couldn't be developed to instantanously check for offside as the play develops,,,i'm sure it can be done...but lets remember this is the debut year for VAR in the England, it is very likely that some of these issues if not all will slowly be reduced or resolved outright..

    Handegg fornever       FOOTBALL Forever

    YNWA

  • 8 months ago

    VAR is a good thing, but it has been used in a horrible way where their is no consistency between games. At the end of the day it's still a human decision.

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