Nour asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 3 weeks ago

Chinese isn't really that hard to learn, right?

10 Answers

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago
    Best answer

    For adult westerners, yes it is - regardless of which Chinese language you are referring to

  • 3 weeks ago

    Wrong.

    15 characters.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Learning any foreign language is a longtime journey.

    Having a different script and being a tonal language, Chinese seems to pose further challenges.

    But in contrast, it is said that its grammar is quite simple...

    • serebrina3 weeks agoReport

      It's important to my business. Conveniently, there is training online. If you have Chinese
      skills you
      can also join the team of teachers https://preply.com/en/skype/chinese-tutoring-jobs 

  • 3 weeks ago

    Shi de, bu hen nan

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  • reme_1
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Not for a Chinese person. ha ha ha

  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    That depends on the languages the learner already knows.

    If the learner only speaks English, then any of the Chinese languages (I presume you are talking about Mandarin, though) are among the most difficult for such a speaker. 

    Per the American Foreign Service Institute, Chinese languages are in level V, requiring 2200 hours of study to reach competency (not fluency).  

    Compared to a level I language @ 575-600 hours of study, that's incredibly more difficult.

    Roughly 4000 Chinese characters are needed for daily literacy in Mandarin. There are both traditional and simplified styles. 

    The vast majority of words are completely unfamiliar to English speakers. 

    Words don't change form for any reason, causing some people to falsely claim that Mandarin grammar is easy.  Word order is extremely important.  Changing it can change meaning rather easily.  Plus there are many structures/phrases with specific grammatical functions. 

    Although Mandarin doesn't express tense for verbs, it does express a variety of aspects (but not the verb itself).  Many of those aspects don't match English ones in either meaning or structure. 

    Mandarin has a complicated system of counters for nouns. 

    The sound system is a bit different from English.  In particular, Mandarin has a number of tones.  Using the wrong tone most often changes meaning (several words many have the exact same sounds, but mean different things depening on the tone used). 

    NO.  Mandarin is not typically quite difficult for the average English speaker. 

    However, the more languages a person knows to a sufficient degree, the easier the next language is (easier.  No foreign language is ever easy). 

    Source(s): native English speaker. taught French; intermediate Italian, German, & Japanese (Japanese is also a level V language); studied linguistics; Japanese was less difficult for me due to my previous experience.
  • 3 weeks ago

    Good ruck with that. I used to work with a Chinese lady, so I asked her to teach me a few words every day. I gave up because it is such a different language from English and is based so much on different vowel sounds, that I found it impossible. I think it is one of the heardest languages to learn. 

  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    26,000 tiny picture characters. Starting with a conceptual base of letters into words and trying to learn a language of joined words without letters.

    Piece of cake.

    [Engish has its own issues]

  • 3 weeks ago

    In my opinion, it all depends on the kind of learning you are.

    I do better with symbolic languages like Mandarin and ASL so they are easier for me.

    Others do better with Romance languages with grammar and word stemming like French or Spanish.

    My advice, try to learn it! See what kind of learning you are.

    Also, you should decide what kind of Chinese language you want to learn. Mandarin? Cantonese? Hunanese? There are a lot of different types.

  • 3 weeks ago

    just try to learn it and see and then you'll know

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