What is more consistent with a God who does not inflict pain?

An unpleasant place where any pain is inflicted not by God but by its inhabitants? Or,

Annihilation?

"And the devil, who deceived them, was thrown into the lake of burning sulfur, where the beast and the false prophet had been thrown. They will be tormented day and night for ever and ever." (Revelation 20:10)

Could Revelation 2:10 be metaphore for annihilation? Perhaps? But if it is, it certainly makes annihilation sound unpleasant. Perhaps being frozen in time at the moment that you are annihilated is eternal torment from you perspective. For you, there is no it's over. You have to continue for it to be over.

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  • 1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    More like oblivion, than annihilation. Once consigned to hell, the souls of the damned will be quickly forgotten by all those who have been justified, in Christ. Since the only "stuff" that will exist in the age to come will be eternal, all the corresponding rewards and punishments will be eternal, as well. No escaping it.

    Source(s): www.askmeaboutgod.org
  • Jeremy
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    Annihilation.  But, I believe I disagree with what you say annihilation is at a definitional level.  If you're in a state of eternal torment, then you still exist.  Annihilation means you don't exist.  And that means you don't exist to feel anything.  I wasn't in constant pain and torment before I existed, before I was born, because there was no me.

    "You have to continue for it to be over," is an oxymoron.  If you continue, then you aren't "over."  Your continued existence to feel anything is the complete antithesis of "over."  You're saying for something to not exist at a point in time, it must exist at that point in time.  That violates logic on basic laws of noncontrodiction.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    James 1:13; Psalms 37:10 jw.org

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    God created me which is painful enough

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  • User
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    1) Could Revelation 2:10 be metaphore for annihilation? Perhaps?

    Logically: no.

    A metaphor never symbolize the exact opposite of its literal meaning.

    That is:

    - they will be tormented day and night forever and ever

    cannot metaphorically mean

    - they will not be tormented, not day and night, not forever and ever. Instead something entirely different will occur. Instead they will be annihilated, they will cease to exist, and so forever and ever they will not suffer any torment whatsoever.

    2) But if it is, it certainly makes annihilation sound unpleasant. Perhaps being frozen in time at the moment that you are annihilated is eternal torment from you perspective. For you, there is no it's over. You have to continue for it to be over.

    That's not annihilation. That's eternal existence.

    Point: what God do you imagine "does not inflict pain"? Certainly we cannot credit the Biblical God with such a characteristic. Example:

    https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=amos+...

  • 1 year ago
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Heretic. What are you, a JW or something? 

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    The OG Jews thought thought that's what death was. Jesus seems to have clarified that Death is a state of continued existence. Most of us take this statement literally. But it is not necessary to be Literal for The Gospel to be meaningful movitaion for desiring to Please God.

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