What are standards for University oboe auditions?

The audition requirements state that scales should be played 2 octaves, but when I asked about A as an example, I was told it isn't standard, so it would not be required. I am not sure how high "standard" reaches. As of right now, I am playing 2 octaves up to F. Should I go to G for college auditions? Also, should the chromatic scale be played from the lowest note to the highest I can play, or should it be C to C?

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  • 9 months ago

    Just to be clear, I do not intend on being a fulltime musician and I am not going to a prestigious conservatory. I will be going to a regular university. I am also curious as to whether you guys are speaking specifically about OBOE. The only scales I am aware of that you CAN play 3 octaves on are the Bb - C scales and those are incredibly high and outside of the written range of the instrument. The oboe has a similar range to the saxophone. It is not like the clarinet. Like I said in my original post, I am not expected to play certain scales at 2 octaves. I fully intend to play MORE than is expected of me. I am just asking to feel confident that I have done more than enough to have my choice of the schools I am auditioning for.

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Blake, it can get confusing if the Asker posts among the answers. If you have something to add you should click on Edit and post an Update.

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  • 9 months ago

    Unless you are applying to some third rate State school, learn all 15 major scales, minimum of 2 octaves -three if possible for some. All arpeggios. My students also know all scales in thirds. Then - all 3 forms of every minor scale - and arpeggios. Also in various articulations. What is listed on their site for etudes and for literature is a MINIMUM. Your own fine private teacher who is a professional oboist (NOT your band director! Or someone who says they teach ALL woodwinds!) will assist you. Unless you get into, thru, and then graduate from a TOP Music conservatory, you will not have any chance of full time employment as an oboist. They are only 8 full time orchestras in the US now - the rest are per-service. And you are competing with all the ones graduated from the last ??? years. Good luck - but this is harder than getting into med school while also playing for the NBA.

    Source(s): Made every single dollar in my life since 1973 in professional music performance, education, and adjuducation. Multiple conservatory degrees, and billions of hours of practice. Including today . . .
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    • Pallmall899 months agoReport

      That's like saying- please play a B sharp scale...… There is no key signature for that, the enharmonic is C.. It is a C scale, not it's enharmonic equivalent.

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  • 9 months ago

    At a music conservatory, all music students should be able to play all 12 major scales at least 2 octaves( if you can do more than 2 that is even better) . Chromatic scale should demonstrate your instruments range, so would go for the lowest note that you can play at a good sound.

    Apart from scales, be sure to learn your orchestral excerpts and start practicing different solo works like sonatas and concerti. Best of luck to you!

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    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      Yes, you cited a synthetic scale. But within the domain of no DOUBLE alterations, F# and Gb exist as an enharmonic pair.. B/Cb. C#/Db. None of these have double accidentals. I *taught* Theory 1 - and many others and areas beyond - for decades. There are 15 scales. 6 are in enharmonic pairs.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    A baby has to enroll in the school

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