Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsCats · 9 months ago

My cat hates my new dog help?

I NEED help here I brought home a 5 year old chihuahua terrier to foster in hopes of adopting. I have a cat who’s around 5 that I’ve had for 2 years who I truly didn’t think would mind the dog, she’s always been the friendliest cat I’ve ever known. Well I was WRONG my cat is not fond of the dog at all. She hisses at her and I’ve never heard my cat hiss up until now. I’ve mainly been keeping them separated with my cat in my room with everything she needs plus treats but I feel awful because I can’t give my cat much attention due to the dog crying and barking when I leave her alone. Ive tried having them both out a few times while I hold the dog and every time my cat slowly lurks toward the dog and starts hissing or she’ll just stare. I’m not sure whether my cat would actually hurt the dog, she hasn’t tried but who knows. I never saw this side of her until now. I want them both to be able to roam and have freedom but I have to be on edge watching their every move when I do. And keeping my cat in my room makes me feel beyond guilty. Should I let them around each other (with dog on a leash of course) more or should I just take the dog back? It’s only been 3 days, I know it may be a slow process for them to warm up but I just don’t know if I can handle separating them so much and my hearts breaking for my cat. But then if I return the dog I’ll feel horrible about that too! I want them both to be happy. Help! :(

10 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    You should......, TAKE THE DOG BACK!

    "But, but, but my cat's never acted like this". IT'S A CAT! They're territorial.

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  • 9 months ago

    Some good advice in these answers. Definitely the best way is to introduce the smells first, i.e. exchanging their blankets so they can smell each other and then letting them smell each other under a door (maybe a week or two!) and eventually, as suggested above, putting the dog behind a gate so the cat can get used to him without him getting too close to the cat. It might take time but if you don't have the patience to do this slowly and allow them to adjust in this way, definitely return the fostered dog to the rescue group and look for another way to help animals. Having a cat that will correct a dog that gets too close is not a bad thing unless the dog is going to attack the cat. Definitely having high places where the cat can escape and watch is a must.

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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Baby gates or a dog pen for the dog. Let the cat decide when or if to make friends with the dog. It can take months for a cat to accept a new animal, especially if its not the same kind.

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  • 9 months ago

    You can't always get what you want. There is going to just be fighting.

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  • 9 months ago

    This sounds like a normal reaction on your cat's part, but aggravated by the fact that you separate them and give the cat less attention and the dog more.

    First, make sure the cat has at least a couple of places to go that are out of the dog's reach. Shelves are good for this.

    Now, the cat will hiss and maybe swat at anybody it's not used to. But if it can get on a high place and watch the dog, it will become interested.

    The cat does not sound especially aggressive; so I wouldn't worry too much.

    Chihuahuas are yappy and jumpy, so that is normal. Being so small, they learn to bluff. I recommend ordinary obedience procedures - teaching the dog "sit" and "down [lie down]" and how to walk on a slack leash. If you don't know how to train this dog, take an obedience class. So many people are afraid to discipline such a tiny dog! The result is often that they don't even teach the chihuahua the word "NO," and they may bite. Sure it's not a timber wolf, but this is not good. Chihuahuas can learn to behave the same as any dog.

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  • 9 months ago

    Honestly don’t worry about it too much. Make sure they don’t actually hurt eachother but other than that just let them work it out. When we brought him my second cat my first cat growled and hissed for weeks. And the second one hid. But after a few weeks the hissing stopped, about a month later they tolerated eachother and now about 3 months later they play daily and have been come inseparable. Same thing with my dog, my cat used to hiss and growl and even try to swipe him. We gave it a few weeks and now he takes naps with both cats.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    You already asked this same question and recieved answers.................

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  • 9 months ago

    Let me understand this, if you return the dog, YOU will feel horrible? Really? Instead of YOUR feelings, do what is best for the animals, and RETURN THE DOG. The dog will be happier elsewhere, and so will the cat.

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  • 9 months ago

    Cats territorial animals so yours is just acting like a cat. Keeping them separated is probably not the solution. If you let them both have access to the various parts of the home they will work it out between themselves. The cat will teach the dog to respect her boundaries and she will accept the dogs' presence eventually. That is what the hissing is intended to do. By keeping them separated you won't allow the two of them to establish the needed balance.

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  • Nathan
    Lv 4
    9 months ago

    Did you go through the introduction process? I suggest watching some youtbe videos but it's basically just keeping them away from each other and only introducing scents; then letting them see but not touvh eachother and finally letting them near eachother (it can take months to bond them properly). If you got your cat from a shelter and she would be the only pet they might not of told you that she didn't cope well with other animals but many cats can't be around dogs and vice versa. If this is the case then I also recommend buying shelfs and cat furniture so she always has an exit ad does not feel trapped - it must get her to a higher point in the room so the dog can't reach

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