Snoopy
Lv 6
Snoopy asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 9 months ago

Is questioning the truth wrong?

Say if someone was shy about it.

10 Answers

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  • 9 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Inquiry is wrong when it infringes on the rights of privacy of others.

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  • 9 months ago

    If what is suspected to be the truth is proved to be the truth beyond all doubt, then it becomes unquestionable, and to continue to doubt its accuracy is stupid.

    Before it is proven, it is just a matter of individual opinion, and is open to any individual

    interpretation.

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  • 9 months ago

    You are questioning the truth reply was wrong

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Questioning the ''truth'' is never wrong but it may be a waste of effort depending on what you are questioning.

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  • 9 months ago

    For all we know, we know nothing - So asking the right questions will expand your horizons with insight and unfortunately more doubt and more questions :P

    • Snoopy
      Lv 6
      9 months agoReport

      Some truths are certain otherwise we wouldn't be living the way we were living but my question is whether questioning certain truths is right or wrong on an ethical pov.

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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Questioning truth-claims is what philosophers, logicians, scientists, and religious (particularly theologians or "defenders of 'the faith'") do. Artists, musicians, etc. indirectly question truth-claims to beauty by developing alternate styles of expression.

    Truth herself is a modern pronunciation of OE triewth, faith, covenant, loyalty, pledge, and triewth is of PIE *deru-, be steadfast, firm, solid. The additional sense of truth being something that is true is from the 15th century, an early application of cultivated sophistication or second-degree framing; by the 16th century, truth additionally imported scientific (and later, "enlightenment") notions of accuracy, correctness--a third degree of framing--i.e., from faith and loyalty as Church and State to the distanced something that is faithful and loyal (opinion of individual inserted into a priorly dogmatic notion), to the more Platonic Dianoia/new science third degree of accuracy--in other words, from truth-claim to individual evaluation of said truth-claim to scientific inter-personal measurement of said truth-claim. These three stages correspond to Plato's Eikasia or personal acceptance of a dogma, to Plato's Pistis or personal opinion re a here-given claim, to Plato's Dianoia, or logical-scientific co-measurement of a truth-claim ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analogy_of_the_divid... ).

    So, questioning "the truth" as accepted dogma or teaching has been part of the English cultural experience since the 15th century; in that sense, questioning is moral and correct.

    If one is the Truth, one does not necessarily answer "mewling" and/or merely reflexive, dogmatic denial or disputation; e.g., Christ Jesus' dealings with those who either knew, and denied, or didn't recognize, the Truth when it stood in front of them. In such cases, said Messiah either melted into the background, His time having not yet come, or stood silently before a government officer of the State.

    Therefore, part of "questioning the truth" is based upon personal psychology (is one in simple, often subconscious denial or even rebellion against the Law of Life, Truth, and Love), and upon what one affirms as "Truth/truth," typically or often based upon Eikasia-like received "tradition(s)," rather than proving for oneself (e.g., the example of John Baptist re Jesus' claims: John sends some of his students to check the claimant to Messiah-hood). It is reasonable to say that God respects an honest seeker of Truth, and is kind and gentle towards the sincere (which word is from the PIE *sm-ke-ro-, of one development (the folk notion of "without wax" is without scholarly support, but conveys the essential meaning of sincere, i.e., wholeness, non-variance)).

    Questioning in this general process = questing for the Truth/truth, and such is conveyed in the phrase "there are no wrong questions"--i.e., when applied to sincere seekers of Truth/truth, even honest agnostics or atom-focused scientists.

    Related:

    Truth: Fruit of Wisdom and Love by Aivanhov;

    The Path of the Higher Self;

    The Great Divorce;

    Mere Christianity.

    p.s. Later Wittgenstein's framing of most of philosophic musing as "language games" that reduce to early Wittgenstein's "Tractatus'" "a brick by any other name would still lay as sweetly" is modified by his later, increased awareness of the psychology of the human soul-field (primarily his own, in a kind of Schopenhauerian Noumenal insight). However, many questions are more properly and easily examined and hence answered, if the terms one employs are clear, as such reduces metabasical shifting or moving the goal posts per personal psychologism or the unknown Self/self.

    p.p.s. For humankind, Truth and Love, as divine qualities of God, Energy, are very close, even as Truth is beauty, and beauty, Truth: "Beauty is truth, truth beauty - that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know." Keats, who might well have added Life, Spirit, and Mind to that, but he was, perhaps observing--and therefore not doing--Whitehead's over-generalization fallacy, not writing of that which he knew not.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    i question gay jews

    i question everything they say and do and who they have influence over (thats almost everyone)

    but in a real society

    it isnt nice to doubt other people

    and you should rarely have to

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  • 9 months ago

    No, not at all. If it is true, with structured and meaningful questioning, it will only enhance it Science and Philosophy are both based on that very concept.

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  • 9 months ago

    No, it is NOT wrong to question truth. That is the foundation if the scientific method. "Truth" is subjective. There is no such thing as "absolute" truth. Like perfection, there is NO agreed upon standard of measurement for truth, perfection or beauty.

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  • 9 months ago

    If you're republican then the truth doesn't even exist.

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