Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Family & RelationshipsWeddings · 9 months ago

What happens if someone publicly objects to a wedding?

We all know that line in the marriage ceremony where the officiant says, "If anyone objects to this union, speak now or forever hold your peace." I've never actually seen this happen, but what happens if someone actually does this? What happens if someone speaks now and doesn't hold their peace?

Does the officiant call off the wedding completely? Does the officiant ignore him/her and marry the couple anyway? Does the officiant invite the objecting individual to have a conference with the couple and talk it out? What happens?

I've been to a few weddings I didn't approve of and I actually considered doing this, but I didn't. I forever held my peace. But what would've happened if I did object?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • Edna
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Nothing would happen, because the couple was already vetted by the state as eligible to marry each other at the time they were issued a marriage license.

    That question hasn't been asked during a wedding ceremony in YEARS.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Edna
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Even if that question was asked and someone raised an objection, that person would probably be escorted out. Any legal impediment to the couple being legally married would have been discovered at the time they applied for a Marriage License..

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    I've only seen it happen in movies - not in real life. I suppose if someone really stood up and objected to the wedding, things would stop and the officiate would take you and the bride/groom in a private room and have a talk on the objection.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Foofa
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    This tradition wasn't just so some jilted ex could make a scene. It was because before the days of codified marriage/divorce records some people would attempt to commit bigamy. So this "objection" was meant to be followed up with the production of a document stating the person is already married. In modern times there's no need for this because the vetting of a bride or groom's marital status was done at the time the license was issued. So yeah, in the modern context anyone disrupting a wedding in this way would probably just be asked to leave.

    • DJC
      Lv 5
      9 months agoReport

      So then why do officiants still ask the question to the guests before they marry the couple?

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 9 months ago

    The officiant would allow you to be heard, but nothing more. It's not up to the officiant to stop the proceedings, only the couple involved. Even if the objection is that one or both of the couple are already legally married the officiant is under no obligation to stop and can continue with the marriage.

    • ...Show all comments
    • linkus86
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      I am saying the officiant doesn't exist as judge and jury to such a claim by someone attending the wedding, and there isn't any harm in marrying them because it wouldn't be legally recognized if either were already married.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • Trish
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    I would think if they are sleeping around that should count too. Ive been in fifteen weddings and it happened once. They go in back with the officiant and call the police and talk. Its usually a stalker or something else similarly. I think they will be more interested in locking you up than stopping the wedding.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 9 months ago

    Depends if it's a legal objection (ie one's already married), or if it's a non-legal objection (eg bitter ex).

    The first would require the officiant to discuss; the second would be ridiculous, and would lead that person to be ejected rather than the wedding stopping.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 9 months ago

    After all is heard and considered, they throw the sucker out.

    • DJC
      Lv 5
      9 months agoReport

      Even if it's a legitimate objection (i.e. not just a bitter ex who wishes (s)he was the one up there)?

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Caz
    Lv 6
    9 months ago

    The question is not whether anyone objects - it is whether anyone knows of any lawful impediment. Thinking these two people are a bad match for each other is not a lawful impediment. Knowing that one of both of them is already legally married, or that one or both is below the legal age to wed, or that they are too closely related to legally marry, would be examples of lawful impediments.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    I would do it if one person was black and the other is white

    • Jerry
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      And this might result in you being Guest of Honor at a blanket party too.

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
  • 9 months ago

    Only a valid legal reason would stop a wedding -I think the wording is valid lawful reason to stop marriage taking place - like person is already married - person is underage - persons are too closely related - person has given false identity

    https://www.livescience.com/22193-wedding-marriage...

    • Commenter avatarLog in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.