Anonymous

Why are workers obligated to give two weeks before quitting?

Some might not like their job and want to be done now. Even one week notice isn't good enough by societal standards.

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  • 9 months ago

    It really is up to the employer. If people will give 2 weeks or any notice at all. If you were a fair employer, treated people fairly and with respect, didn't try to cheat them, paid them for all work done, etc then people will want to leave on good terms. If the employer demeaned them, didn't respect them, worked them hard and tried every loop hole to try and screw them regarding pay, overtime, workload, then people not think twice to leave them high and dry if a better opportunity comes along. A former employee may not get a reference but a bad reference or disparaging remark by the former employer that prevents a person getting a job is grounds for a lawsuit.

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  • 9 months ago

    No one is obligated unless it's a term of a contract they signed. It is considered a standard courtesy to not leave an employer hanging. But there's no obligation. Just as there is no obligation for an employer who gets the advance notice to keep you for that week or two weeks. Some employers, probably about equal in percentage to employees who just up and quit, up and fire the employee that gives notice. Both actions are considered a sign of poor character.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    It's not a legal requirement unless you signed a contract that says you will. But it'e rude and juvenile not to.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Courtesy

    and when you want a new job later it will help you get better reference

    as well ,, you never know the person you dump on today can move to another job where she/he is the one choosing and if you dumped on her,, she will remember

    it is good character and remember none of us like 100% of our work,,,, but no matter where you go there you are.

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  • Kyle
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    i would say majority of workers work at an at will employment. not contract or other method. an at will employment means employers can let employees go for any reason without notice. in turn, employees can leave for any reason without notice as well.

    it is just common practice and good faith to give two weeks notice both ways. for the employer, they can close off any last pay roll and other paper work easily and hopefully find a replacement. for the employee, you can have time to prepare and find a job that lines up for when your last day is.

    if you're on good standings, you can ask them as reference or even a character letter from your supervisor's and management.

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  • 9 months ago

    Your not obligated to give two weeks notice but if you don't, don't expect a good reference.

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  • 9 months ago

    Yes, it benefits the employer to keep the work flowing without hardship to customers or other employees. The trade-off is that most employers make it worthwhile for employees to give notice by extending benefits not required by law to those who give notice, such as pay for unused sick days, unused vacation, good attendance etc. Employee handbooks usually explain how much notice is required to receive those benies.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    So they can find a replacement.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    It is considered polite. It gives employers a little time to find a replacement. Workers aren't obligated; they can just not show up. If they take that route, they don't use that boss as a reference.

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  • 9 months ago

    It isn't about the employee. It is for the benefit of the employer who will need to find a replacement or rearrange work to cover the fact teat they are one person short.

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