What is the degree of e^(y/x)?

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  • TomV
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    The concept of degree of an expression is only applicable to polynomials.

    The expression e^(y/x) is not a polynomial.

    The expression has no degree.

    The question is analogous to asking the color of anger.

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  • 5 months ago

    Only polynomials have a degree. e^(y/x) isn't a polynomial.

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  • 5 months ago

    The degree of e^(y/x) is (y/x).

    • Lv 4
      5 months agoReport

      good answer, also, : x such that x≠0 etc

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    y/x .

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  • JOHN
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    The degree of y/x is deg (y) - deg (x) = 1 - 1 = 0.

    e^(y/x) is a function of y/x and has degree 0.

    An illustration from physics might help clarify this.

    Dimensionally, whenever the exponential appears

    in a physical equation, the argument of the

    exponential must be a dimensionless pure number,

    or else the expression doesn't make sense and can't

    be a term of a true equation. For instance Planck's

    radiation law states E(ν) = hν/[e^(hν/kT) - 1]. Now

    [hν] = [joules] and [ kT] = [joules] (k = Boltzmann's

    constant, T = Kelvin temperperature). so we have

    joules/joules = pure number and e^(hν/kT) makes

    sense. Further, on te left of the radiation law we

    have joules and on the right we have joules/pure

    number = joules. Thus the hν/kT of e^(hν/kT) has

    to be a pure number for all to make sense.

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  • 5 months ago

    It would be y/x degree

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  • 5 months ago

    probably a tan...

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