If any space probe sent has barely left our solar system, how do they know the distances of the milky way galaxy and even beyond?

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Try this... it explains the different methods very nicely:

    https://youtu.be/moiSQ-Gc5pg

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • 6 months ago

    By "SWAG" (Scientific Wild *** Guess).

    They have several models they use, but all of them are flawed and inexact.

    The other part of reality is we don't know how far away they are now. If something is said to be 2 light years away, the light we are basing that location has been traveling 2 years. So we have a guess about where it was two years ago and which direction it appeared to be headed. But its direction of movement is relative to the earth which also has moved in two years. If the objects are closing on each other at close to light speed (each is traveling at near light speed towards the point of impact) the combined speed is such that impact will happen before either sees the other coming. This could be happening right now- that an object we thought was 2 light years away is actually only one light year away and before the year is out our planet is cosmic dust.

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  • 6 months ago

    they use red shift and blue shift. They can tell how far an object is by the changes in wavelenght

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Actually, there are a couple of probes launched before the apollo project that are now in intergalactic space.

    • Warren
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Absolutely NOT! Where did you ever hear this insane fairy tale?

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  • Nyx
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Here's all the ways that distances are measured in astronomy.

    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/distance.htm

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  • Tom
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Likely red shift spectrography

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  • 6 months ago

    Most of the information that we have

    regarding the size and depth of our Milky Way Galaxy

    has been gleaned from the Hubble Space Telescope.

    With regard to satellites and probes, we base their distance from us

    by the signal strength that returns to Earth when it is received.

    • ...Show all comments
    • Campbell Hayden
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      Nowadays, yes ... I agree, Cosmo.

      But the HST was allowing us to focally determine the size & depth
      of the galaxy for more than decade before GAIA ever hit the launch pad.

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  • 6 months ago

    In several different ways. For nearby stars, the distance can be calculated from how much they shift compared to distant surroundings when this planet is on opposite sides of the Sun. For others, there are variable stars whose period is related to their luminosity, so their brightness can be found and the discrepancy between this and the brightness in our sky indicates the distance.

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  • 6 months ago

    More than one telescope separated by a good distance can quite accurately determine the distance of stars in our galaxy.

    The diameter distance of the Hubble space telescope orbit is over 13,000 Km and the difference in angle to even some distant objects can estimate far greater distances using triangulation.

    Parallax and triangulation, celestial dynamics and laws of physics all come into play.

    To my know, within the Milkey Way, we have mapped over 400,000 objects, know their position and distance as well as movement. Still less than .01% of the galaxy.

    We don't usually send probes without knowing the distances they will be traveling.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Other scientific methods

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