should you put lube behind your brake pads?

ive watched countless videos from Chrisfix who has 5million subscribers to other videos where they put a little bit of lube on the back of their break and and on top and bottom where it rides the calipers for anti squeak. My mechanic friend and others are telling me no I shouldn't, brake dust can accumulate. Made me look like a fool as they all argued against me while i told them I've seen countless opinions online from amateur to career machanics saying to use lube. Which is right? And yes, I agree that since car factories dont come with it why should you but are the online opinions ive read wrong then? your thoughts?

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  • 1 year ago

    All modern braking systems require some type of brake grease. High temp synthetic brake grease for the caliper slide pins and on the anti-slips. Moly grease or anti-seize on the back of noise reduction shims where they contact the metal caliper, and a light film of moly grease on the face of the caliper piston. See this post on what type of brake grease to use and where to apply it. NOBODY uses anti squeal anymore. No needed if you do the brake job correctly in the first place

  • 1 year ago

    NO. Your mechanic is correct. The only thing to install behind brake pads are the shims that come with OEM (original equipment manufactures) brake pads. Grease behind the brake pads will melt and drip on the rotors, from the rotors tp the new brake pads.

  • 1 year ago

    Brakes don't make noise if the rake job is done properly and premium brake pads such as Advance Auto Platinum pads are used.

    the Platinum pads come with the metal hardware that the pads ride on in the caliper brackets. You need to wire brush, scrape and file the rust off of the brackets before installing the metal hardware.

    Grease does pick up dust and it does keep the pads from moving so I don't use grease anywhere but on the slide pins.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
  • 1 year ago

    You never put lubrication on your brake pads. You can put a smear of an anti-squeal compound, which is copper-based, on the pad's backing plate; that helps to cut down noise. It's only a smear, not a great big dollop which could work its way round onto the friction material, nor is it ordinary grease or other lubricant..

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  • 1 year ago

    A little high temperature grease on the back of the pad can help it move and stop squeaks. New cars don't use it because they are brand new and everything works, but add a few years driving, accumulated dust, rust filth and grime - nobody ever cleans their brakes - and the pads don't move freely in the caliper like they did when they left the factory. Grease can attract dust but the magic words her are "a little". If it helps your vehicle, go for your life.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    It is true that thorough scratching away any rust or dirt is important when installing the pads. It is okay to lubricate the edges lightly. The stuff behind the pads is designed to keep the piston glued to the pad, the better to retract.

  • Fred
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Do not ever put any lubricant on the brake pads or rotors. Brakes rely on friction to stop you are putting lubricant on there will, make them fail. I think you can buy anti squeal products which will stop the noise but will not affect your ability to stop. Check with your local car parts shop.

  • 1 year ago

    Anti squeal compound is what you should use on the back of the brake pads to prevent squeaking. Some folks will use high temperature wheel bearing grease and be relieved of squeaking. The friction face of the pad should never be greased or stained with anything. You do not want the caliper to get greasy ever.

  • 1 year ago

    Its optional. You don`t have to as they have an insulation pad on the brake pad. So it comes down to preference.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    IF by ''behind the brake pads'' you mean to lubricate the guide spindles the calipers ride on, the answer is yes - here - https://www.wagnerbrake.com/technical/technical-ti...

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