Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 5 months ago

Why isn't the "Y" considered a vowel?

17 Answers

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  • Jim
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Who is to consider? When you ask about "consider," you are asking about opinion. There is no authority in the US or UK to regulate English. France has Académie française, and Spain has Real Academia Española, but there is nothing like that for English.

    Vowels are sounds. The way they are written in a language is another matter.

    I know you were taught that Pluto is a planet and also that the vowels are a, e, i, o, u and sometimes y, but that is not true.

    Depending on the dialect, English has about 14 vowels and they are written in a variety of ways.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology

    Many letters are used in English to represent these sounds.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_orthography

    As you can see, w, h, y, and l are combined with other letters to represent English vowel SOUNDS. The last word is redundant, but I add it for emphasis.

    There are systems to write English phonetically, but they are cumbersome.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonet...

  • Joseph
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Sometimes it is, as in 'monkey'.

  • 5 months ago

    It varies by language and the way it sounds in the word.

    • Don Verto
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      The Dutch substitute IJ for Y and it is always a vowel

  • 5 months ago

    It is considered a vowel, phonetically at least. Phonologically only sometimes and the reason is: a phonological vowel is at the center or peak of a syllable but Y is only sometimes in this positon.

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  • 5 months ago

    It depends the countries. In France Y is a vowel and too, a half vowel. Like when we say the word ' yeux ' for example, which means eyes in English .....

  • 5 months ago

    Sometimes Y doesn't want to play along. It suffers from Irritable Vowel Syndrome.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      I like that; I'll pass it off as my own, next time I'm talking linguistics with friends.

  • Mike W
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    In English Y acts as a vowel at the end of a word or syllable. Maybe they don't consider it to be a vowel, because it also acts as a consonant. One thing to consider is that Y wasn't always a letter in the English alphabet. It wasn't used in Old English, and only started to be used in Middle English.

    • Rod5 months agoReport

      It comes from Greek: the French call it i-greque, the Spanish, i-griega

  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    It IS in Welsh.

    Welsh has more vowels than English.

    A, E, I, O ,U, W, Y.

    • Lôn
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Or Llwyd (grey) or Llwyth (load), or Llwyn (grove) .

  • 5 months ago

    It is. Vowels: a, e, i, o, u -- and sometimes y.

  • 5 months ago

    It gets used much less as a vowel then a consonant.

    • Zac Z
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Also in the ubiquitous preposition "by".

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