Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 6 months ago

Is it ok to ignore my puppy?

I just got my 1st ever dog at 9 weeks old. I had an exhausting 1st day with tons of play and unsure of what to do. I don’t want to play with my dog all day. I need some peace and quite now and then for longer than my puppy naps. I would like to rest for multiple hours to regain my energy. Is it ok to just ignore my puppy when she wants attention? It’s not like I’m leaving her alone. She is near or someone else at all times. I do intend on playing and exercising her but I don’t want to all day. I want to decide when play time is and when rest time is. I felt a lot better just leaving her alone and not playing with her.

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  • patty
    Lv 5
    6 months ago

    take her for a longwalk in the morning to tire her out

  • 6 months ago

    Ignore is a strong word ..

    What breed? Why aren't you being able exhaust that wee pup while playing and instead getting exhausted yourself? Play fetch, she runs and brings the ball back while you wait.

    None here are playing 24 hrs a day with their puppies. We manage to get adequate rest in between. But, during the next couple of days, you need to get that pup attached to you, which seems is working well. Once she trusts you with her life, everything will fall nicely in place.

    Next few weeks will be a very crucial period of her life. If you manage to utilise it by socializing her, you'll get a great companion for the rest of her life.

    Trust me, only first few days are hard, don't lose heart..

  • J M
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Why did you get a dog if your don't want to pay attention to it?

  • 6 months ago

    ● "Is it ok to ignore my puppy?"

    Your question raises more REAL questions than you bothered to supply information about. So let's start with YOU telling us:

    💥1: Ignore it WHEN, [Nicholas] ?

    💥2: What BREED (or breeds) and gender is it?

    💥3: What do you want it to do for you when it is a trained adult?

    💥4: How many years old are YOU? And how many weeks have you arranged to be home 24/7 settling Pup in, house-training it (with NO computer, homework, phone calls, tv EXCEPT when pup is asleep but you are wide awake)?

    💥5: Have you booked yourself in to a well-conducted training class so that there will be a gap for you to, when Pup is 18-to-22 weeks old, start about a year of being COACHED to improve your awareness, body-language, consistency of command words, timing & use of (a) commands, (b) the leash, (c) praise & rewards, (d) voice-tones?

    ● "I just got my 1st ever dog at 9 weeks old. I had an exhausting 1st day with tons of play and unsure of what to do."

    Exhausting? I have reared maybe 10 pups that I purchased, and over 300 pups that were born from my retentions. I have NEVER found it exhausting. My first 2 pups were Fox Terrier x Cocker Spaniel crosses when I was 9 (no vaccination available for Distemper, so it died) and 10. With the exception of a Cairn Terrier that my wife wanted when she got pissed-off with the local GSD breeders, they have all been GSDs. Hence my queries about the BREED and the PURPOSE.

    ● "I don’t want to play with my dog all day. I need some peace and quite now and then for longer than my puppy naps."

    Okay - you've there admitted that you are not suitable to be a dog owner.

    You've had this pup just ONE DAY, so must now return it to the breeder or the dog-rescue group, and must accept that a cat or mouse MIGHT suit you, but a dog doesn't. I wonder just how overweight & non-athletic you are!

    I also deduce that you do NOT have a back door that opens straight into a well-fenced back yard so that, once Pup IS house-trained, you can leave that back door open during fine weather so that Pup can go out to explore & piddle-poo and can come back in to check on what YOU are doing. The noise of household equipment and passing people & traffic are important parts of a wee pup's education aka "familiarisation".

    ● "I would like to rest for multiple hours to regain my energy. Is it ok to just ignore my puppy when she wants attention? It’s not like I’m leaving her alone. She is near or someone else at all times. I do intend on playing and exercising her but I don’t want to all day. I want to decide when play time is and when rest time is. I felt a lot better just leaving her alone and not playing with her."

    I recommend that you do NOT become a parent. Most dogs are FAR easier to raise than are children! Be glad that you aren't a Preschool Minder or a school-teacher!

    You Commented to the first [Anonymous]:

    ║ What!? I think you got things wrong. I am willing to play with my dog multiple time a

    ║ day and for her to get enough exercise but not all day. She keeps begging me to play

    ║ with her and I feel that I have to every time she begs. It feels like she is in control

    ║ all the time. Ok maybe it was just really hard the 1st day. I was just asking what I

    ║ should do, if ignoring her at times is ok or if it’s just bad. I want to do what’s right.

    Obviously you DON'T "think" properly, [Nicholas] !

    Learning to be ignored is part of a pup's education. It's usually no big deal, as long as it isn't rejected and so can't watch what you ARE doing. But as you have not yet answered my 💥1 as to WHAT & WHEN might be ignored, I don't yet have the INFORMATION to give a useful answer. From about 6 weeks old (depending on the season & weather) my pups spend their nights in a pen with a raised sleeping box at the far end, with their dam in there too to keep an ear & eye on them, During fine days they have the 4 "levels" of the back half of my steep hillside to explore. During daylight 1, maybe 2 at a time, are brought inside so I can do individual familiarisation & character & instinct testing.

    The first [Anonymous] you made 2 Comments to might not have been "sweet", but made very good points in such a brief answer. However, "he" was wrong to tell YOU to rehome the pup

    YOU shouldn't rehome the pup - you simply don't have the experience & INTEREST to do a good job of choosing a new owner. You either right now CHANGE your way of thinking and your unwillingness to do things while "supervised" by the pup (and so Update your Question to answer my five 💥 questions), OR you return Pup to where you got it.

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    😛 To discuss GSDs, join some groups such as

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/GSD_Friendly/i...

    by sending an e-mail about yourself to the Subscribe address on that page.

    The people in them KNOW about GSDs. Plus you can include several actual photos in your posts.

    To find other groups or breeds, type the breed-name into the top field of

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/dir

    then choose a couple of groups to Join - use the group's

    Message History

    on its /info page to make sure that it still has members who are ACTIVE.

    😛 Also join

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/The_GSD_Source...

    so that you can easily look up all sorts of information about dogs, especially GSDs. It is an "encyclopaedia" group (to which members can ask for new sources to be added), not a discussion group.

    King Les The Lofty - first pup in 1950; GSD breeder & trainer as of 1968

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  • 6 months ago

    More toys to chew!

  • 6 months ago

    No, it is not okay. You took on a very young animal that needs attention constantly. There are lots of responsibilities you have now that you didn't have before the puppy. Raising & training a puppy is difficult if you do not know what you are doing. Next to impossible if you don't give a damn.

    If you have done any research on raising a puppy, you need to. Right now you need to potty train it to go outside to potty & you have to teach it not to bite. First two things any pup needs to learn. But you need to know how to train the dog to do these things. Research is the only way you are going to learn the things you need to know, to train the dog. & training doesn't stop there. Lots more training to come. TIME consuming, YES. But it is a MUST.

    Ignoring your puppy now would be like him not responding to the recall command & he just goes off in the other direction, completely ignoring you.

    Since puppy's have to chew, get lots & lots of things he can chew on. There are interactive toys/puzzles for puppies & dog that keep them busy trying to figure out how to get a treat out of one of the puzzles. But get lots & lots of chews. Children's wooden cubes, raw bones, never give a cooked bone to a dog, only raw bones. Give him a chicken leg or wing, raw bones from the butcher. Get appropriate size bone for size of your pup.

  • 6 months ago

    Let me guess - you're 14 years old and whined and whined and WHIIIIIINED to get this puppy. But now that you realize how much work they are you don't want to give it any of your time?

    Tell your parents you're too immature for a puppy and give it back to wherever you got it from.

    If you're an adult then wow - you're WAY too immature for your age and DEFINITELY not a good match for a dog much less a puppy!

  • 6 months ago

    The short answer is “no”.

    The long answer is: depends on what you want from your puppy/dog.

    If you want an attuned companion, a dog who is alert, attuned to you, well socialized, self controlled, fun, well mannered and trained - then no, it’s not ok.

    If you are willing to allow your dog to grow up into whatever it becomes based on whatever pickles it manages to get itself into, then sure, feel free to ignore your puppy.

    What were you thinking you wanted when you brought home a puppy? Was it reality based with what caring for a puppy entails and the limited abilities of a young puppy?

    As the human in charge, it is your job to structure this puppies environment so it can be successful.

    This puppy is a BABY dog who is totally dependant on your, has only a few weeks of life experience in a very limited environment and has just been removed from the natural, warm, snuggly, 100% of the time contact with it’s litter mates and mom.

    YOU are now this puppies entire world. You chose to bring home a puppy. They are a lot of work. It gets to be less work as you and your puppy bond and acclimate but this is real life having a puppy. You have ONE chance to get it right as your puppy rapidly grows into a dog.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I do it all the time. Yesterday, I came home from the bar and my puppy got loaded off the fumes from my burning oven.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    I'll make it short and sweet. Rehome the dog. You are in way over your head, and it's not fair to the dog.

    Puppies nap a LOT. They burn themselves out, and then they nap.

    Rehome the dog.

    • E. H. Amos
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      You should be DELIGHTED you have such an interactive puppy instead of one that is fearful or howling or CRYING for its litter mates! Instead, you are displeased with a super TRAINABLE well adjusted confident puppy! You sound like a SPOILED BRAT!

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