from where electron comes during beta decay of a radioactive element?

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  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Some nuclei have extra neutrons and make them unstable. Therefor protons decay into proton and electron. The electrons come out. They can not stay in the nucleus because their de Broglie wave length is much larger than nuclear radius. So they come out.

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  • 1 year ago

    given that charge (and mass) cannot be created or destroyed, it must involve the segregation of a once-neutral item (a neutron) into a negative and positive constituent. The electron is the negative, low mass constituent, and it escapes. It leaves a proton behind in the place of the formerly neutral neutron.

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    All particles are made of charge, spin, and mass/energy. The raw ingredients of all elementary particles are the same few things, all that changes is the amounts. When a particle decays it loses an amount of these to find a more stable configuration. The amount that was lost then clumps together forming new particles that sum to what was emitted. In principle anything could form that has the right total but there is also a statical aspect that makes certain particles more likely. So the electron is made from raw ingredients as it is emitted.

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  • 1 year ago

    In the nucleus of the radioactive element, a neutron is changed to a proton and an electron which is emitted. The emitted electron is said to be a β-particle.

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