Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 year ago

Are there other ways that planets could receive enough heat to sustain life besides the goldilocks zone around a star?

So I have been researching astronomy lately and this topic has stumbled across me and was curious if there are other ways a planet could sustain life without being in the goldilocks zone. I did read about Tidal Heating which can plays a role with IO but haven't done enough research on it. Was wondering if there was anyone on here that knows a few things.

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  • 1 year ago
    Favourite answer

    Yes. If its sun is far away, a planet could be heated by tidal friction or geothermal heat from its interior, or radioactive decay of elements inside it or excessive lightning or interaction with solar wind. I bet there are other heat sources too. Nature is very clever.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Internal heating.

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  • NiJo
    Lv 6
    1 year ago

    There are species who live next to "black smokers" at the bottom of the ocean. We are just beginning to understand how diverse life can be. I doubt that is an exclusive symptom of Earth.

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  • 1 year ago

    Internal Heating, or a close, partially Molten Moon

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  • 1 year ago

    Yes. Heating can also occur as a result of the radioactivity-induced heating of a planetary interior.

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  • 1 year ago

    Sufficiently strong greenhouse gases could retain geothermal energy. I do not know if such greenhouse gases could exist. Life may be possible close to the termination on a world within the goldilocks zone, if the planet is totally blocked to its sun. Except that its sun would discourage water vapor.

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  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    It's unknown. Even if there exists one, it can't be known because there are billions of planets and each one can't be observed

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  • 1 year ago

    NASA Exobiologist Chris McKay, PhD, has speculated that life could have evolved on Saturn's moon Titan, but not using water but instead using liquid methane as the primary cellular solvent. This is a fascinating concept. If such a lifeform attempted to visit Earth, it would be like humans visiting Venus.

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  • 1 year ago

    Not that would be practical, you are talking global here.

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    Why don't you go there and find out?

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