Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelAustraliaCanberra · 2 years ago

As an employer, would you be willing to hire potential employees who have mental illnesses on his/her medical report that were not true?

I'm considering a career change into either a security guard or an Apple Store "Genius" but don't know if I should be taking legal action for medical malpractice involving psychiatrists from one clinic falsifying my medical records with mental illnesses I didn't have in the first place. The initial psychiatrist either thought I was suffering from psychosis and schizophrenia when he didn't believe me I was defamed by someone that caused others to treat me with contempt, or because he thought I* was an actual paedophile when I told him I told lies to other people that I am a paedophile when I was never one. I also had other psychiatrists from this clinic misdiagnose me with other mental illnesses either because they also believed I am a paedophile when the inital psychiatrist wrote a report saying I told lies about myself being a paedophile or because the anti-psychotic I was forced to take had caused me to exhibit symptoms of all illnesses it treats.

I've already taken a 2nd opinion from another psychiatrist at a different clinic and was given the all clear for any mental illnesses. I just need to know if I should take legal action for medical malpractice and needs to be done before I can take legal action.

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago
    Favourite answer

    If I was an employer and I asked to see your "medical report" then I would be breaking several federal and state laws.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Unless the job requires a medical exam type thing like joining the Army, police, firefighting service, things like that, they wouldn’t see your medical history

  • 2 years ago

    Wage Cheat is clearly mentally ill. Old Coward is just retarded.

  • 2 years ago

    Based on your post, You come across as unbalanced and delusional, perhaps you should seek out professional treatment.

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    The only way I would know my employee had a history of mental illness would be if the employee would tell me OR if the employee's behavior would be an indicator OR if I would see the hundreds of posts the employee has made admitting to mental illness.

    For example, if the employee entered a guilty plea to pedophilia - “I'm BEING CONVICTED of a crime I didn't commit? ... I was arrested on site, taken to a police station and questioned where I was promised that a court would go easy on me if I went easy on the police, so I confessed to this crime I didn't commit but will be telling my side of the story when I go to court.” https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20180...

    Another example would be claiming to be a former Senior Constable when, in fact, the employee never was a Senior Constable. “I'm a former senior constable from Victoria Police who is considering moving to the US and starting a security/ police career as soon as I can clear my medical record with another medical record that shows no mental illness.” https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20181...

    Shocking - AGAIN - that you were a senior police officer but have no knowledge of the hiring practices of the Police and security companies.

  • 2 years ago

    There's no malpractice there. One psychiatrist gave his opinion, it seems another has give a different opinion. Simple as that.

  • 2 years ago

    Your employer would never see your medical records.

  • 2 years ago

    psychology being extremely inexact -- you'd spend hundreds of thousands on the case and accomplish nothing.

    As an employer, I hired anyone who presented as capable of doing the work I needed done -- as long as they didn't have a history of violence or theft from employer

  • Lili
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    A misdiagnosis made on the basis of your own words and behavior is not "falsification," and I doubt you'd get a judgment in your favor. Frankly, whether you've been given the "all-clear" or not, your history is bizarre enough that if employers knew about it, they might look askance at you even if you DID get a judgment in your favor. Just reading your post really makes wonder about you and your mental health.

    Don't bother with a suit. You'd likely lose time and money for no good result, and employers can't ask to see your medical records anyway.

  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    As an employer I don't have access to my staff's medical records.

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