Brian
Lv 5
Brian asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 2 years ago

Language learners, how many new words is realistic to learn every day?

9 Answers

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  • 2 years ago

    You would do very well learning 5 every day,including meaning,spelling and how to say themThat is an amazing 5 x 365 in a year.Most people in every day speech do not use more than about 1,000 different words and fewer than 100 of the most common words.Good grammar is more important than very many words.

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  • 2 years ago

    There's really not a measure for this.

    Especially since what is considered a "word" is a bit fuzzy when comparing languages.

    Also, how do you deal with verbs? For example you learn 5 different verbs but only one form. Now if I teach you a new form (say, the past tense) do you know say you learned 5 new words? Conversely, at some point you'll know many forms or tenses or conjugations for verbs. So every time you learn a new verb does that mean you suddenly learned dozens of new words - one for each form/conjugation/tense you know?

    Honestly, don't worry about the number of words. Most of the time you'll learn a patter and a list of words to use with it. As time goes on you'll learn additional words for existing patterns you know, and you'll learn all new patterns - some using words you already know.

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  • Anonymous
    2 years ago

    It is not realistic to learn new words one by one. They should be learned in chunks of meaningful phrases. For example: instead of learning the single word "careful," you could acquire the following. "Be careful what you want. You might get it."

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    That depends on how long you study each day, on how well your particular brain copes with learning language, and which language you are learning.

    Personally I think I would learn fewer words in Polish than I would in Spanish - that is just how my brain works.

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  • 2 years ago

    As an English learner, I don't learn words one by one. I started to learn the grammar and conjugation, then I read and write phrases regularly ( English speaking forums, chats, emails .. ). Thus little by little, I learn new words naturally, without even realize it...

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  • 2 years ago

    Depends on the language, method of learning, types of words you're learning (nouns, pronouns, connectors, etc.)

    I always find nouns the easiest as I can connect it with an image, but struggle with connectors.

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  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    2 years ago

    You don't learn words in a single day.

    Best method:

    Use flash cards.

    Determine how many cards to work with actively during a session. Start at about 10 and adjust up or down according to your needs and abilities.

    First session:

    Work with each card during the session until you get it correctly three times in a row, or three out of five times in a row.

    Following sessions. Review active cards from previous session, the same way (3x in a row, or 3/5).

    Add new cards as you remove old ones from the active pile.

    Keep cards in the active pile until you get them correct 3 sessions in a row or 3/5. Them move them to a review pile (once every few sessions).

    Remove a card from the active and review piles once you are sure you know them. Then review them once in a rare while.

    Mix the cards up when you review.

    Practice sometimes from English to target language, and sometimes vice versa.

    Long term memory requires reading, writing, speaking the words aloud, and hearing them. (The first three you can do with flash cards). You decide which to do during a session, but over the course of your session you need to do all of them.

    Practice using them, whenever you can, in complete sentences (writing, in your head, translating what you hear around you, your own inner thoughts, etc).

    Source(s): taught French to English speakers; native English speaker
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  • 2 years ago

    I aimed at 20, but I could do more if I wrote them down and used them in sentences.

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  • 2 years ago

    That depends on your foreign language aptitude.

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