Is it likely that in a different universe, Newton's Laws would still be valid?

Much has been said about how remarkably fine-tuned the many laws of physics and constants to have provided for such an universe we're familiar with today. But astrophysicists also think and speak of "multi-verses", where other universes can and have existed with a different set of laws of physics and... show more Much has been said about how remarkably fine-tuned the many laws of physics and constants to have provided for such an universe we're familiar with today. But astrophysicists also think and speak of "multi-verses", where other universes can and have existed with a different set of laws of physics and constants. Nonetheless, how likely is it that Newton's Laws would prevail in most or many of them, even as other things such as particle (both fermions and bosons) masses and properties should be different? Could it be that Newton's Laws, like weeds, just crop up nearly everywhere? A much harder question: What would be some of the necessary conditions for Newton's Laws to "thrive"?

This is just a free-for-all question, I'd like some opinions on this speculative subject. There are no right or wrong answers.
Update: A more pointed question would be, "Are Newton's Laws independent of other laws and constants? For example, could Newton's Laws prevail with or without String Theory?"
Update 2: Graham P, I can just re-imagine that epic scene in "2001: A Space Odyssey", where moon astronauts uncover the sentinel, standing before a breadbox-sized one.
Update 3: Noether's Theorem points the way to understanding why we can have Newton's laws, whcih is that existence of symmetry provides for things like conservation of momentum. However, such symmetry can arise in any number of ways that aren't related to "sub rosa" processes, such as quark dynamics.
Update 4: Vasek, you are, of course, right in pointing out that Newton's Laws are only true "in the approximate sense", which suggests that such "approximately true laws" are a consequence of the "real laws" of this universe. What I am arguing here is that even if this universe had a different set of "real laws", it could... show more Vasek, you are, of course, right in pointing out that Newton's Laws are only true "in the approximate sense", which suggests that such "approximately true laws" are a consequence of the "real laws" of this universe. What I am arguing here is that even if this universe had a different set of "real laws", it could be that there will still be a Newton V.02 coming to the same conclusions as Newton V.01 did.
Update 5: As an analogy, Bernoulli's hydrodynamic equation could still be useful, even if nuclear and molecular forces of the fluid medium should be different. It has a generality that could be fairly independent of those atomic processes.
Update 6: Lots of wild and woolly speculative stuff here, eh?
Update 7: I think Brian's assertion that an universe "NOT supporting [Newton's Laws] might mean that [it] wouldnt last long" is closest to the mark. I think it would take a fairly bizarre universe to not even have approximate linearity in time and space to permit Newton's Laws, and so it could be that the chances of it... show more I think Brian's assertion that an universe "NOT supporting [Newton's Laws] might mean that [it] wouldnt last long" is closest to the mark. I think it would take a fairly bizarre universe to not even have approximate linearity in time and space to permit Newton's Laws, and so it could be that the chances of it either be of any interest or have any persistence are slim.
Update 8: Vasek's lengthy reply to this presumes that Newton's Laws aren't "correct" because we know now that they are only approximations "of the real thing". But that is missing the point of this question, which is that we could still find Newton's Laws in other universes as "mere approximations of the real thing", which... show more Vasek's lengthy reply to this presumes that Newton's Laws aren't "correct" because we know now that they are only approximations "of the real thing". But that is missing the point of this question, which is that we could still find Newton's Laws in other universes as "mere approximations of the real thing", which can vary and yet still yield the same approximating Newton's Laws.
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