Are you prepared for *kitten season*?

I can see it happening right now. Question after question about pregnant cats. Soon the shelters will be exploding with kittens whose lives depend on finding a home.

Due to the economy, rescuers (myself included) are mostly full to capacity with animals and won't be able to save as many as in years past. Last year I went to a shelter that had boxes of kittens stacked in the hallways waiting to be killed because they had run out of room. Is it really too much to ask for people to have their cats spayed/neutered?

Legit: What made you decide to have your cat spayed/neutered?

Update:

It was hard not, Amanda. But like I said, I have no more room at the inn and no funds to care for them if I had a 20 room mansion. Adoptions have dropped to an all time low because people just can't afford pets right now and shelters don't have money/room for them all. If they were never born, they would never have to die like that.

27 Answers

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  • A
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    I got my cat spayed because my friends cat kept on having kittens all the time and it took a lot of work to find them all homes . Though i was kinda scared because of the anesthesia and that they were going to cut up such a little cat ,though now i'm happy i got lori spayed because she doesn't have to go thru heat and having kittens all the time . I also convinced my friend to spay her cat , because she was nervous that her cat would not make it through that procedure and she is glad she got her cat spayed too . Yeah i think it's heartbreaking that so many little kittens have to be put down because of careless people or who don't think it through .

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  • 1 decade ago

    No,I am not ready.I hate to see it come.Last summer,I ended up with 4 kittens.My brother took one,but I kept the other three as all of the shelters were full and they would only take them to euthanize. So now I have 15 cats! I don't need any more,nor can I afford them,so I hope that no one dumps any kittens on my porch this year. I was just watching Animal Cops:South Africa,and there,they will spay or neuter animals for free.I think that this country needs to do the same thing,as more people would take advantage of the chance to get their animals fixed.

    I had my cats and dogs spayed or neutered because it is better for their health and I don't want them having kittens or puppies. It's a shame how many animals are killed because people are so irresponsible.If they cannot afford to get their animals spayed,then they shouldn't get them in the first place or they should keep them indoors and save the money to get them fixed.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Our shelter has...around 90 cats currently. Some of which are available and some that are not (yet). Our Humane Society put out a plea in some of our local newspapers about our high relinquishments have been, and that even if you weren't 'looking' for another cat, if you could possibly afford another one it would make a huge difference. And WOW did that make a difference in cat adoptions! In the last two weeks we've had close to 40 adoptions! We had in one day, 7 cats go home! When you only have a population around 100, 40 cats makes an enormous difference. Just a month and a half ago, we had about 170 animals, most were cats, with maybe 15 dogs, and a few smallies (hamsters, guineas pigs).

    I will honestly never understand why people don't spay/neuter their pets. Both of mine came pre-sneutered because they were both adopted, but I will always do it no matter where I find my animal. It is incredibly sad, but our shelter is lucky that we have the luxury to only have to euthanize animals with severe behavioral or medical issues and never purely based on resources.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I don't think I could ever feel prepared.

    I cannot stand to set foot in a shelter. I haven't been in one for almost 15 years to get a puppy. It's just too much for me to handle.

    When I was 8 we got a kitten for my brother. They had a room full of kittens. It was an amazing experience for me as a kid being surrounded by kittens. They were so cute. About a week after that some disease got passed around in the shelter and every kitten was killed. That's something I will never forget.

    Even without going to shelters, there's still plenty of heart ache outside my door. I try to do what I can for the stray and feral kitties in my area. I get coupons from friends that I use to help pay for the food they get each night. But they still face too many dangers and don't live long out there. So I have to prepare myself to catch any girls that show up and get them spayed. I did let the girl who found us last year have her kittens since she was already quite pregnant and very happy to be inside, but I won't do that again. I love her and we had homes for the babies lined up before they were born but there are too many kitties out there and I can't keep any more inside so it has to be spay and release.

    Why did I decide to spay/neuter?

    I didn't. I've never even considered not getting it done. I always had pets growing up and they were always fixed. To me, it's just part of having a pet.

    Where I live now it's illegal not to have your pet fixed - not that anyone checks though.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Excellent point Pretty Kitty. I hope all those people who've been asking questions about their pregnant cats read this and get the idea (but they probably won't because of course, people always have excuses as to why THEY are not part of the problem; even though they are)

    We're having a nice quiet period at work at the mo. We do a lot of work with The Cat's Protection (main cat charity in England) so we always have strays boarding with us, sometimes for quite a while; we're not really equipped, we only have cat cages, no runs; but the Cat's Protection never euthanase healthy animals so sometimes there's just nowhere else for them to go.

    Soon we'll start being loaded up with kittens. The Cat's Protection can only fit so many in their shelters and foster homes; many that come in (even the ones that don't require medical attention) have to board with us until there's room for them. We have some kittens for up to a month-6 weeks; that's a large portion of their kittenhood spent in a cage!!

    This is the story I tell people who think it's OK not to neuter their cat (male OR female) before 6 months of age. There is no excuse, yet people never stop trying to give them.

    Chalice

    Source(s): vet nurse, feel free to email
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  • 1 decade ago

    If I went to that shelter that you are talking about and seen all of those kittens in boxes in the hallway waiting to be put to sleep, I probably would have wanted to take them all home with me. And its really a shame that we cant do anything - all we can do is try to help people understand why spaying/neutering is important! No animal should have to die because of irresponsible owners.

    And that's why I spay/neuter my cats. There are too many cats being put down everyday due to kitty overpopulation, really, if you think about it, is so so so sad.

    If we all spay/neuter our pets..this problem wouldnt be as big of an issue as it is now.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    We don't have ''kitten season'' in our sleepy little village. All of our cats are neutered because the rules specifically state that all outdoor cats must be spayed or neutered. We have feral cats that are also rounded up every year for spaying and neutering and shots.

    There hasn't been a litter of kittens around here in over three years. We get our replacement cats from local farmers.

    And all of this is accomplished without the benefit of an animal control officer or a local animal shelter. And our only vet is 40 miles away. All this is done with local volunteers and donations.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I do hope that the question you asked will at least bring this problem to the attention of a few people that are not totally aware of the impact one unaltered cat can have.

    I also rescue mostly barn (dumped) cats, as well as, help care for a feral cat colony of 50 plus cats...(TNR).

    I find myself struggling with economy issues that make it more difficult for me to continue rescuing all this kitties, then finding it hard to place the ones I do have. (brand new litter of 4 born last night from stray mama!)

    We have all found ourselves affected by the economy BUT don't let it be an excuse to not alter your pets. Many communities have low to no cost spay/neuter clinics. It is so important to stop this vicious cycle of unwanted pets being born.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Kitten season breaks my heart. I have two cats and I really wish I could adopt more but I simply can't. Both of my cats are fixed as much as I love kittens I don't want them popping out every few months, and a cat in heat is SOOO annoying.

    Personally ( gets ready for the thumbs down) I think if you can't keep the kittens you should have the cat brought to a vet and fixed as soon as she is of age. Or if she does get pregnant get her fixed ASAP. If you feel bad about aborting a litter of kittens just think of the thousands that are put to sleep or die from neglect or exposure every day.

    I think if a cat owner can't put the kittens in a shelter or rehome them or keep them they should have to euthanize them. I'm not talking about drowning kittens I'm talking about bringing them to the humane services or a vet and having them humanely put to sleep. I think having to see a healthy beautiful kitten being put to sleep would get someones rear end in gear so they would get their cat fixed.

    As for no kill shelters, they are not the magical solution to everything. The one here stirred up a lot of controversy because if their animals become " unadoptable" they get sent back to the city shelter which isn't no kill. They may have changed their policys now but that upset a lot of people. Many No kill shelters will refuse animals for many reasons. The big one being they're too full and can't take any more.

    I think there needs to be spay and neuter clinics that easy to access and easy to afford. I know some people that have paid close to $300 to get their female cats spayed. If clinics had days where you could get your tom cat done for $30 and your queen cat for $50 I think you would get more people getting their animals done.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    My only kitten isn't a kitten anymore. he is now our 2 year old baby, and he is a rescue from the Humane League, and was fixed before we brought him home. we are in a bind right now since a black stray has been hanging around. I agree that the Humane League right now is in tough times, and I really didn't want to turn over this cat to them, for fear of you know what happening to it. We have been feeding it, and sheltering it, and it's looking like she might soon being taking a trip to the vet, via me and becoming our second baby. As long as our first baby doesn't cause too much of an issue. What else are we to do? Our kids are becoming too attached....

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