suzielu asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 1 decade ago

Toilet? Restroom? Washroom? Bathroom, Powder room?Loo? Lavatory?

Tell me which word is used in your country to mention the room where people urinates/defecates, wash hand? do the personal things

Update:

THanks for all of the answers that you have given.

@Razna: Your answer really helps! It's an elaborate one that I've ever needed. Again, thanks a lot. I've got some ideas about these words now.

Update 2:

@computer junkie: "out house" is somehow like the word we used to have in the past in Vietnam. But nowadays, it is no longer used. We would use WC or Toilet instead. In some restaurants, there is a W.C sign in front of the toilet, or Ladies' and Men's for some.

I know some of the Japanese sign language. If I'm not wrong, they use the thumb and index finger to form a round which means " let's talk about money".

Update 3:

@computer junkie: "out house" is somehow like the word we used to have in the past in Vietnam. But nowadays, it is no longer used. We would use WC or Toilet instead. In some restaurants, there is a W.C sign in front of the toilet, or Ladies' and Men's for some high standard restaurants and hotels

I know some of the Japanese sign language. If I'm not wrong, they use the thumb and index finger to form a round which means " let's talk about money".

Update 4:

@Isabelle: ohhh! If the word LOO is derived from French word "l'eau", I am wondering why the English don't say "LOW" but LOO for the toilet? LOL. if pronounced correctly, it should be LOW, not LOO (if so it will be "LOU" in French, not l'eau anymore)

Update 5:

@Isabelle: HAHAHHA! eau de toilette! funny word if we translate it directly into English ( toilet water) That was what I thought back then when I hadn't got to learn French, and wondered how come they have such words on perfume bottles.

It's not until now I really know the difference between Eau De Toilette and Eau de Parfum. You make me laugh!! LOL

15 Answers

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  • RAZNA
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago
    Best answer

    Now that's a practical question that has a thousand answers, all depending on who you want to talk to! If you're talking to a 2-year-old, it's the potty. If it's a truck driver it's probably the john. If it's an 80-year-old lady who's very upscale and fancy, you'd better say restroom or she may faint. If you're in my house, it's just a plain old bathroom -- it does have a bathtub in there and I really don't care what body function you plan to exercise in there, so we need not get all spiffy and talk about details.

    In school, we said lavatory because the teachers were allergic to function words, but that always sounded too much like a scientist's laboratory to me. My auntie tended to say "little girl's room" or "little boy's room" even when it was all adults, but that seems a little too cute for my taste. In England, they could all be depended on to understand "loo" if everything more polite failed. And here in the U.S. they'll understand "toilet" when all else fails, but that's pretty rude.

    Only fancy ladies talk about a "powder room" or give the excuse that they want to "powder their nose" because we don't use powder makeup anymore. It's all creamy and liquidy. But I do hear that occasionally when old ladied like myself get together in large groups and they don't want to admit out loud that they need to go tinkle. I've also heard much vaguer terms like "the other room" and just "I need to go" with raised eyebrows or a glance in the appropriate direction, which embarrasses easily embarrassed people. Or I just say, "I'll be back" like Arnold Schwartzenegger in his famous movie "The Terminator" (and I mimic his Austrian accent and say it in as deep a voice as I can manage, but being a little old lady that's not very deep and being a Texan, my Austrian isn't very good). People usually miss the joke, unfortunately and they just think I'm weird. Sigh.

    Then again you can do like the littler kids in school did and assign numbers to the functions (though why in heavens' name the teachers wanted to know THAT I can't imagine). I need to do number 1 meant pee and I need to do number 2 meant poo. And babies who can't count as high as 2 say wee-wee and ka-ka.

    Oh, and one more. In the U.K. (England), in the airport, they labeled the bathrooms "W.C." which is short for "water closet" an expression which probably hasn't been used in its long form for at least a century! When I took French in high school, they told us that's what they use in France too, only they say "weh seh". And in Mexico, supposedly, they say "el sal de banyo" (I've spelled it more or less as they are supposed to say it) but nobody I've ever met from Mexico uses that expression! So much for what they teach in language class! When I taught English as a second language, I just led them all to the restrooms and pointed to make sure they found them!

    I'm sure that's more than you ever wanted to know.

    Source(s): Teacher of English to speakers of other languages from Texas, where everybody has their pet name for that place in addition and teaches their 2-year-old a weird name for their bottoms too, so their preschool teacher will be sure not to be able to communicate that need until the child is soaking wet!
  • aida
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    In the US, in a private home that room is a bathroom or a lavatory. The latter word is used, along with "half bath," to mean such a room without a bathtub or shower, but the use of either word is most frequent among builders and real estate people. To the rest, it's just a bathroom. (After all, a guest who asks to use your bathroom probably doesn't want to take a bath .) .

    In public buildings, such a room is most often called a restroom. "Powder room" is another term for a women's restroom, although the name seems to be going out of use.

    I beleive that "washroom" is mainly British for what Americans call a lavatory, while in British usage "lavatory" means specifically a toilet, loo, or W. C.--one fixture, not the entire room. Americans occasionally use the word "loo" either for that fixture or for the entire room, but it's not common.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Toilet? Restroom? Washroom? Bathroom, Powder room?Loo? Lavatory?

    Tell me which word is used in your country to mention the room where people urinates/defecates, wash hand? do the personal things

    Source(s): toilet restroom washroom bathroom powder room loo lavatory: https://biturl.im/vZ1Cp
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm from England.

    I say loo at school, at home or in public.

    Toilet is considered to be a more common expression, and my mum objects to me saying it...lol

    I might ask where the bathroom was if I was going for a shower or a bath but not to go to the loo.

    Lavatory and powder room are quite old fashioned.

    Bog if you are being really informal.

    When we had an american girl in my class and she asked to go to the bathroom the teacher used to go: 'Why, are you going for a bath?'

    Okay that was just a random anecdote from me..

    xxx

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  • RE
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    In the United States it would be bathroom for a home, restroom for a public place, including restaurants, and ladies' room or men's room if you want to be specific. Powder room is now a jocular euphemism.

    As for the pronunciation of l'eau, don't forget that English feels free to derive the word beauty from the French beauté, but we also used to call a boyfriend a beau. We are not a logical people like the French.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    In my home I say toilet. Outside I use "washroom" because it is the most common term here.

    As a piece of info....the British "loo" comes from the French "l'eau" (water). When ? I do not know.

    You are giving me an idea for a question though.....thanks !!

    WC in France (was reading above) is pronounced V (like for Vietnam) C (bit like say...but not quite)

    edit : yes you are right . It should be pronounced like low then :-)...languages evolve all the time so do sounds/accents etc. Back a long time ago people were shouting " attention à l'eau" meaning they were about to throw urine from their windows and alerting passer-byes. Or maybe they were throwing it at the Brits during the 100 year war ...who knows ???? :-))- kidding -

    eheheheh.....I should have never said it,

    Think of "eau de toilette" now...another meaning completely lol !!!:-)).

    Faire sa toilette means to wash yourself (you are going to laugh at that one too now ! face , body etc ). Maybe "eau de toilette" was the earlier version of deodorants...

    edit : with parfum you come out smelling of roses...

    Do you think they will ever make perfume out of durians ???:-)

    @ the answerer below : Japanese toilets should have a completely different names........from what I hear/read they are kind of special :-)

    @Bei bei : imagine a guy asking for the "powder room" ??

    I do not know if anyone mentioned it there is the term : latrines also. But hardly used. Just for public places.

  • 1 decade ago

    In my school days... We usually said Teacher., May I go to the toilets...

    But to the Chinese Teacher: We said: Lao Shi Wo Yao Xiao Bian, (Teacher, I want to go pees...)

    At home we said Toilet or Bathroom...

    In Public we said: Toilet, Restroom or Washroom... Sometime we do hear lady said: "where is the ladies' room" But never heard any guy said where is the MEN's ROOM...

    When I was young I do often heard people said WC... But not anymorre these days...

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I live in the UK.

    And we use a number of things :)

    Toilet .. if your asking a teacher to go ro something

    The Loo or Bog with your friends.

    Ladies room, or Gents if your on a date.

    Depends how polite you are,

    I have a friend who calls is the Anus Area.

  • 1 decade ago

    In the UK:

    informal - loo

    formal - toilet

    old fashioned - lavatory

    when refering to room in house - bathroom

  • 1 decade ago

    In the Philippines, people use the term comfort room or Men's / Ladies Room.

    in the dialect they say banyo (i think its a spanish term)

    In Japan, where I live, they say toilet or in Japanese they say otearai (which means "wash hands")

    theres also the term latrine which is mostly used in the military

    i know they used to call it "out house" long ago when the restroom was separate from the main house...

    but i dont think people use it in this day and age...

    i still see the sign W.C. or water closet here in Japan

    http://image.space.rakuten.co.jp/lg01/30/000006493...

    in the Japanese sign language they use the thumb and index finger to form the letter C and raise the middle, ring and pinky fingers to form W to mean Toilet

    or rubbing both palms to mean wash hands

    http://www.d1.dion.ne.jp/~chaca/wc.htm

    hope this helps

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