How do my parents go about telling my sister that Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, & the Tooth Fairy arent real?

I need a way for my parents to tell, or even hint, to my little sister that Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy are not real. She really believes they are real despite the other kids' opinions on this issue at school. She's 10 years old and will be 11 in a couple months. Should they wait to tell her or should they tell her now? I would appreciate ANY suggestions that you guys have. Thank you so much.

17 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I would let her find out on her own. I'm sure she is smart and she will figure it out. A really great way if they feel the need to tell her is to do what a friend's parents did they told him "Honey I think its about time we showed you Santa Clause" Then the parents and the child put together a box for a needy family. They drive to the house, leave the "goodies' on the porch, They then say "Congratulations - Santa" Or there is also a wonderful little book call Christmas Socks by Andy Andrews. It would make a wonderful gift for her

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You should never tell a kid that Santa is not real. As for the Easter Bunny, well if you want to believe in that one, I haven't a problem with it. The tooth fairy is real of course as any parent will tell you. Granted we don't have wings and a wand, but I guarantee you that somebody definitely leaves money under your pillow, and the tooth ends up missing.

    Somewhere along the lines the child may ask you for the truth, and at that time you should tell them the truth. That Santa is an ideal, a person who gives without asking anything in return. We really need more Santa's out there. You may want to skip the truth about the Easter Bunny is you know what the truth is. And of course the tooth fairy is real....

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  • 4 years ago

    E. When I found my baby teeth were still in my mom's dresser drawer, that's when I knew the Tooth Fairy wasn't there for me anymore. She was for someone else once I got my adult teeth. Kind of a coming of age when you get your second molars. It doesn't matter to me because I'm not in her charge anymore. But I won't say she's not real for the kids who still receive coins for the baby teeth that come out. After all, each tooth lost was because a new tooth came in, and that meant a child was growing. It was exciting to me! Santa Claus I have already expounded on. Whoever is responsible for compassionate and charitable giving, Santa Claus and his many counterparts in other cultures, as well as the Three Wise Men who bore gifts to the Christ Child, are all examples and teachers of love in the world. The Easter Bunny--not so much, because WE were the ones who decorated the eggs that the Easter Bunny hid Easter morning for us kids to find. Easter is much more a high holy day.

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  • Santa Claus IS real. Even though we were adults and my parents were adults, my grandmother always did the santa claus thing. Her motto was "You don't believe, you don't receive." She even gave us easter baskets on easter. And with it we always got a new easter dress, an easter outfit and a new bathing suit to start the summer off with.

    It was just more fun for us and for her if she got to write from Santa on all the gifts. Of course we knew that he wasn't real, and that she spent hours at a time in packed stores for 5 months before christmas to get all of our gifts, but where's the fun in that? Thats one thing I miss about her. Also, when I was 19 and had my wisdom teeth removed, my mom brought me a dollar bill and said "Here, .25 for each tooth, Toothfairys broke this week."

    If they are going to tell her, then just sit her down and tell her. It doesn't mean however that they can't continue doing the Santa and Easter Bunny thing on those holidays. It can be a fun tradition for the whole family.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Why are you so anxious to burst her bubble about this? Why not let her keep "believing" as long as she is happy doing so?

    She probably really knows now, but is just wanting to hold onto this little part of her childhood innocence.

    But if you insist, I would ease into it with a "teachable moment" opportunity as in when it is coming up in conversation either situationally or seasonally. Start with what she believes and have her explain and expound on it and carefully play "devil's advocate" to see how she reacts.

    Watch a movie on the subject--"Prancer" or "Miracle on 34th St" are classics--and use them as a springboard for discussion. Put the reality in the context of the "spirit" of St. Nicholas (who was a real person, by the way) living on through the generosity of others. You could even come up with a way for her to "play" Santa or Easter Bunny by giving to someone else less fortunate anonymously with no expectation of return or recognition.

    I genuinely hope you will allow your parents to take the lead on this and not just drop this on her like a bombshell out of meanness.

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  • 1 decade ago

    My son is 11 and I think he still believes in Santa Claus. At Christmas I'll talk about Santa's gifts under the tree and you'll have to wait to see what Santa gives you. He'll say mom I know there's no Santa and I'll say what are you talking about? He doesn't push it and I don't either. Whether he still believes or not, he still wants to believe in the magic of Christmas so let her hold on to her childhood as long as she can. Don't push it. She'll grow up fast enough as it is. Just let her be a kid.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Wow, I figured it out in second grade because of kids talking about it on the bus. She is pretty old to still be believing. My parents confirmed it with a book titled, "Is Santa real?" I cried, then I accepted it.

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  • mom2C
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    my daughters friends told her at 8 and she came home and questioned me about it. I kind of put her off and didn't really answer her. She finally said she felt like everyone was lieing to her. So I told her the truth. I also said she couldn't tell younger kids because it's fun for them to believe. She felt all grown up knowing the truth.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i started when my children first began hearing about santa.

    i explained about the gentleman in the middle east long ago

    who enjoyed doing good anonymously. when he died they

    missed him so much that they started doing things for others

    and then exclaiming "it must have been that saint nicholas"

    word spread and more and more began doing the same

    thing. since saint nicholas is just another way of saying

    santa clause, you can do it too. any time you do something

    nice for someone without letting on it was you who did it,

    you are being santa clause.

    they figured out for themselves that the easter bunny and

    the tooth fairy were in the same category.

    at 10, your sister may have figured it out for herself. and

    be milking it. in case she hasn't be gentle with her because

    some, and not only children, will resist to the point of

    violence giving up a cherished belief.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Let her believe as long as she wants to.........

    How old were you when you found out? Why are you so anxious to make her AWARE.......

    My kids had other kids telling them early and when my kids asked me about it, I said "when you don't believe he won't come anymore". The anticipation is exciting for kids and it's tradition, it doesn't harm anyone........

    I enjoy my kids being excited about the holiday traditions, someday when life gets harder they have these memories as cues to lighten up and be happy, no matter what.

    Let The Good Times Roll

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