How can a computer understand anything?

I know that all a computer relates to is binary, and it conducts calculations from there, but how does it even know what to do?

How can a circuit know that it should work something out?

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  • CRAIG
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    Everything can be related to 0 or 1 - on or off +ive or -ive power. In a computer that's all it's doing, turning on and off power to make a binary (0 or 1 signal in the electronics). This is known as the computer 'logic'. The programming of the chips say that if it receives (say) three 0's and 5 ones then it should do something else - a bit like a road - you turn left or right depending upon the options as you travel along it. These decisions are called logic 'gates' in computing and are simple decision such as AND, OR, NOT e.g. do this AND that, OR that or do this but NOT that. Millions/billions of these decisions are done in one second (or even 1 microseconds - pronounced 'mew' can't write the character looks like u with along stalk like q). Depends on the power or 'cycles' of a computer (e.g. 1 megahertz or 1mHz is 1000 cycles per second so a 4gHz or 4 Gigahertz CPU is doing 4x1000 or 40 000 cycles per second - also known as operations). In reality , the computer is always doing subraction to make these decisions but that's getting into the low level electronics! :o). The programmers at Intel or AMD write what's called low-level programs (often called assembly language, or with the speed of chips now, just normal programming languages) which tell the chip when to make these decisions. The chips are then 'burned' with these decisions in a process called PROM or EPROM - which you can google or look up on wiki (en.wiki.org)

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  • 1 decade ago

    The way computers "understand," or seem to have any intelligence is through multiple layers of abstraction (high-level languages, applications, wizards, etc. vs. simple, specific machine code, which all of these are eventually translated to.

    The Intel or AMD processor at the heart of you computer has millions of transistors (switches) arranged to preform simple operations such as moving, comparing, and performing simple operations on numbers. To get a start on understanding this, search terms such as "AND gate" to see how simple, binary operations are wired from a few switches.

    Where computers really shine is with anything involving mathematics and physics. Since most real world problems can be modeled in math and logic, replicating this in a few lines of code can make it look like the computer actually understands something, while in reality it is simply performing calculations that mirror the law of physics (or whatever) in the real world.

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  • Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Simplistically, that's what software does - relate commands and instructions to enable all the bits of hardware to produce results for the user to see/use.

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  • 1 decade ago

    it does not understand anything. it translates it, then compute it, then relay it

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  • 1 decade ago

    learn how a processor works with software

    ------------

    ASSEMBLER

    ------------

    Code segment

    Data segment

    Extra Segment

    I am missing one

    ---------------------------

    IP intsruction pointer

    ---------------------------

    and all the flag and control lines

    --------------------------

    this is an elementary type 8088 - 8086

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