I bought a house, seller didn't disclose plumbing issue in garage, I need to know what to do about it.?

The garage has a sink and urnal in it. It looks like they are hooked up to the public sewer system. I had a home inspection and they did not see it was messed up and previous owners failed to mention this. I found out later that it drains into a big pit in the ground. I think this is illegal and one question on disclosure asks if anything is illegal on the property. I dont have a lot of money to higher a lawyer. But want to make them fix it. What should I do? Part of the reason I bought the house was to turn this space into my art studio. I need proper drainage for the sink. I got a plumbing estimate and its over 3,000 to fix. Does anyone have any advice? I live in PA.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favourite answer

    I hope you had a realtor. Realtors are responsible to be sure that the owners tell the truth. That's why I got out of it. I'd start with him/her and if they don't give satisfaction, report them. Licensed realtors are held to a very high standard and complete disclosure is part of it. See if they can't do you some good. Next try small claims court. But even if you win, it may be difficult to collect. There are always those lawyers that will take your case for a portion of the take and they can tack on their fees. They have to win to get paid. It sounds like you have a good case. Lots of luck. Nothing better than a urinal that drains straight into the ground to make you want to grow a vegetable garden in the neighborhood. I moved into a very poor but beautiful area. I had a properly working septic system but many of my neighbors did not. We get flooded regularly and the water is . . .disgusting. The local government came along and said we HAD to have the sewers connected and pay much higher bills plus higher taxes for bonds passed to do this thing. I've always been a fighter for personal rights and while all my neighbers were screaming no, I was the voice over in the corner saying yes--let's do it. I helped a neighbor's daughter save her mother's house being foreclosed and the toilet was dumping straight out on the ground. Ugh! What are they thinking?

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Don't just roll over and play dead! In looking at the other answers I think the "Cost to Cure" clause (CTC) can and would apply. In most every boiler plate purchase contract I've read they are included. Unfortunately they are often to used incorrectly by real estate agents. The cost to cure clauses found in purchase agreements was created for exactly this scenario. The seller either didn't know or chose not to disclose the leak. Read you purchase agreement and any addendum that apply. If you feel you need help. Call your real estate agent . If you did this as a private sale without an agent ask whom ever wrote the contract if you have a CTC. Housing advocacy groups in your area may also be a resource. Lastly talk to your new neighbors find out if you seller had disclosed to them the roof problems. If the seller had you should have cause to litigate. Your home inspection company would also be on the hook. What type of guarantee/ warranty did they rpovide you with? Get a minimum of 3 bids have the problem fixed. Then work at getting you money back from the seller if they witheheld information or the inspection company if the were neglegent. I have a hard time reading all of the answers that say give up, YOU ONLY CLOSED THIS TRASACTION 2 WEEKS AGO.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would actually approach the seller (via telephone or email--not in person. People get emotional about property). If the seller is reasonable and honest (good luck), you should be able to come up with something. If the seller balks, threaten a lawsuit. Even if you cannot afford to sue, don't let the seller know.

    If you used real estate agent to buy the home, go to the agent and explain things. Basically, you're not asking the agent to solve your problem (it's highly unlikely he/she cannot), you want a referral to an attorney who will give you 5 mins to explain the situation. The agent (or the agent's broker in charge) should know at least one attorney who can give you a free consultation to help you better assess your options.

    If you didn't use an agent to buy your home, simply consult the telephone director for an attorney. Ads for attorneys will be quite easy to find, for they are probably the biggest ads in your directory. Call around until you find someone willing to give you options.

    Source(s): Real estate broker (not licensed in PA)
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    hi pa

    iam not a lawyer every state differs but in fla u may call and write a complaint to hud about the situation or call legal aid but where i am from only the seller can be held responsible if he said in the contract binding the home that if anything is broken he will fix it in the addendum and if u hired an inspector and he missed if and u agreed with everything it really nothing u can do u have basically excepted that responsibility

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  • Contact your Realtor who will work with the other agent to figure out what needs to be done. If no resolve, contact an attorney. There could be city issues, permit issues, etc... that can make your small problem even bigger.

    Talk to the pros then make a decision on whats best. Good Luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    something similar happened to me - but in MD - basically (in MD) on the contract they check a box declaring that they disclosed everything they know of or they check the box saying they disclose nothing and it's up to you to find the things that are wrong - that's why you get the home inspection - (again in MD) if they check the disclose nothing box there's nothing you can do - you might be able to take some action against the home inspector for missing something so obvious - but they probably covered their but in the agreement you signed with them - the only thing i can think of is perhaps you might be able to contact the local building inspectors and see if they needed to obtain a permit for that kind of work and if they did in fact obtain a permit for it - if it needs it and they didn't get one you MIGHT be able to take some legal action against them - the problem is the inspectors might throw it back on you and make you fix it or fine you for not fixing it or revoke your certificate of occupancy - kicking you out of your house - it's a double edged sword - good luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    you need the advice of a real estate attorney.

    1st meeting with atty is usually free.

    good luck...

    Source(s): 40+ years experience
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  • 1 decade ago

    Contact the State office that monitors home sales in your county...they can help you.

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