who know history about bermuda triangle?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil's Triangle, is an area in the Atlantic Ocean where the disappearance of many people and their aircraft, and surface vessels has been attributed by some to the paranormal, a suspension of the laws of physics, or activity by extraterrestrial beings.

    According to the Triangle authors Christopher Columbus was the first person to document something strange in the Triangle, reporting that he and his crew observed "strange dancing lights on the horizon", flames in the sky, and at another point he wrote in his log about bizarre compass bearings in the area.

    An explanation for some of the disappearances has focused on the presence of vast fields of methane hydrates on the continental shelves. A white paper was published in 1981 by the United States Geological Survey about the appearance of hydrates in the Blake Ridge area, off the southeastern United States coast.[4] Periodic methane eruptions may produce regions of frothy water that are no longer capable of providing adequate buoyancy for ships. If this were the case, such an area forming around a ship could cause it to sink very rapidly and without warning.

    Compass problems are one of the cited phrases in many Triangle incidents; it is possible that people operating boats and aircraft looked at a compass that they felt was not pointing north, veered course to adjust, and got lost quickly.

    An explanation for some of the disappearances pinned the blame on left-over technology from Atlantis, for example, the activation of a still-operable death ray.

    Theorists also claim extraterrestrials captured ships and planes, taking them beyond our solar system.

    There is more information at:

    www.bermuda-triangle.org

    Source(s): www.wikipedia.org
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  • 1 decade ago

    The Sea has always been a mysterious place and ever since people have ventured into the waters off of Bermuda strange incidents have been noted from strange fireballs of light startling the sailors aboard Christopher Columbus's boats to the disappearance of aircraft & ships during the 20th Century.

    Actually any number of places can claim a reputation as mysterious as that of 'The Bermuda Triangle' however the origin of the phrase dates from around 1950 but truly exploded into people's conciousness with the 1974 publication of a book entitled 'the Bermuda Triangle.' Since then TBT has become an industry spawning books movies and episodes of television - - -

    So the true history is the history of the phenonema called 'The Bermuda Triangle,' whereas the incidents cited, though colorful & strange, are truly merely a part of the many mysteries of the Seas.

    here is a Wikipedia Blurb

    History of the Triangle story

    According to the Triangle authors Christopher Columbus was the first person to document something strange in the Triangle, reporting that he and his crew observed "strange dancing lights on the horizon", flames in the sky, and at another point he wrote in his log about bizarre compass bearings in the area. From his log book, dated October 11, 1492 he actually wrote:

    "The land was first seen by a sailor (Rodrigo de Triana), although the Admiral at ten o'clock that evening standing on the quarter-deck saw a light, but so small a body that he could not affirm it to be land; calling to Pero Gutiérrez, groom of the King's wardrobe, he told him he saw a light, and bid him look that way, which he did and saw it; he did the same to Rodrigo Sánchez of Segovia, whom the King and Queen had sent with the squadron as comptroller, but he was unable to see it from his situation. The Admiral again perceived it once or twice, appearing like the light of a wax candle moving up and down, which some thought an indication of land. But the Admiral held it for certain that land was near..."

    Modern scholars checking the original log books have surmised that the lights he saw were the cooking fires of Taino natives in their canoes or on the beach; the compass problems were the result of a false reading based on the movement of a star. The flames in the sky were undoubtedly falling meteors, which are easily seen while at sea.[1]

    The first article of any kind in which the legend of the Triangle began appeared in newspapers by E.V.W. Jones on September 16, 1950, through the Associated Press. Two years later, Fate magazine published "Sea Mystery At Our Back Door", a short article by George X. Sand in the October 1952 issue covering the loss of several planes and ships, including the loss of Flight 19, a group of five U.S. Navy TBM Avenger bombers on a training mission. Sand's article was the first to lay out the now-familiar triangular area where the losses took place. Flight 19 alone would be covered in the April 1962 issue of American Legion Magazine. The article was titled "The Lost Patrol", by Allen W. Eckert, and in his story it was claimed that the flight leader had been heard saying "We are entering white water, nothing seems right. We don't know where we are, the water is green, no white." It was also claimed that officials at the Navy board of inquiry stated that the planes "flew off to Mars." "The Lost Patrol" was the first to connect the supernatural to Flight 19, but it would take another author, Vincent Gaddis, writing in the February 1964 Argosy Magazine to take Flight 19 together with other mysterious disappearances and place it under the umbrella of a new catchy name: "The Deadly Bermuda Triangle"[2]; he would build on that article with a more detailed book, Invisible Horizons, the next year. Others would follow with their own works: John Wallace Spencer (Limbo of the Lost, 1969); Charles Berlitz (The Bermuda Triangle, 1974); Richard Winer (The Devil's Triangle, 1974), and many others, all keeping to some of the same supernatural elements outlined by Eckert.[3]

    Peace

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  • 1 decade ago

    One important thing to consider when talking about the Bermuda triangle and all of the disappearances is that the area also had much heavier traffic than other parts of the world. So statistically, there really haven't been that many more disappearances, just many many more boats and planes in the area adds up to more weird stuff over time.

    Also, there is a "Great Lakes Triangle" as well, with even more recorded disappearances of ships than the Bermuda one. Also with more traffic.

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  • 1 decade ago

    section of the North Atlantic Ocean off North America in which more than 50 ships and 20 airplanes are said to have mysteriously disappeared. The area, whose boundaries are not universally agreed upon, has a vaguely triangular shape marked by the southern U.S. coast, Bermuda, and the Greater Antilles.

    Reports of unexplained occurrences in the region date to the mid-19th century. Some ships were discovered completely abandoned for no apparent reason; others transmitted no distress signals and were never seen or heard from again. Aircraft have been reported and then vanished, and rescue missions are said to have vanished when flying in the area. However, wreckage has not been found, and some of the theories advanced to explain the repeated mysteries have been fanciful. Scientific searches have revealed nothing to substantiate the storied peril of the region--wherever it may be. Boaters and fliers continue to venture through the triangle without event.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Its a song by Barry Manilow.

    Bermuda Triangle

    Look at it from my angle

    Genius

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