• What's zero divided by zero?

    124 answers · Mathematics · 4 days ago
  • How do I kill the spider?

    7 answers · Zoology · 17 hours ago
  • Why don't we terraform every planet in the solar system?

    Alter the landscape, climate, oxygen levels, etc. of every planet with a solid surface to make them comfortable and livable for our future selves. Mercury, Venus, and Mars are relatively close and should be the easiest to deal with, so no real problems there.. The gas planets might be a little tougher to convert,... show more
    Alter the landscape, climate, oxygen levels, etc. of every planet with a solid surface to make them comfortable and livable for our future selves. Mercury, Venus, and Mars are relatively close and should be the easiest to deal with, so no real problems there.. The gas planets might be a little tougher to convert, but a solid platform (covered with soil) over the methane and ammonia (or whatever it is that fills Neptune, for example), and a solid wall to block the 1300mph winds, would be about all we need (I think). We'll have to deradiate and degravitate Jupiter somehow...that one sounds the trickiest so we will have to save that planet for last. After this planet goes belly up we'll all need a relaxing place to stay. So call it hard work well rewarded when we finally finish. Yes, I know it would be a lot of money but it will be worth it. And, yes, the engineering feats are a bit tricky, but we have such brilliant minds on this doomed planet, it should't be too much trouble to start drawing up the blueprints. The sooner the better- so lets get crackin' fellow geniuses! I would say have the report on my desk by Wednesday morning, but I don't know how to build a desk.
    18 answers · Astronomy & Space · 22 hours ago
  • What is 1\10 of 5 dollars?

    19 answers · Mathematics · 2 days ago
  • If universe came into existence by a big explosion(big bang theory), then what was the driving force behind that explosion?

    Best answer: When Father Lemaitre (a priest who happened to be a good astronomer and a very good mathematician) tried to explain the apparent expansion of distant galaxies (which he had measured with the astronomer Edwin Hubble), he used the analogy of an explosion. (The Primeval Atom Hypothesis, 1927). By the time he... show more
    Best answer: When Father Lemaitre (a priest who happened to be a good astronomer and a very good mathematician) tried to explain the apparent expansion of distant galaxies (which he had measured with the astronomer Edwin Hubble), he used the analogy of an explosion. (The Primeval Atom Hypothesis, 1927).

    By the time he developed the mathematical model to explain the expansion of space itself, the explosion had been removed. It is space that expands, thus ever increasing distances between galaxies (as long as they are far enough apart to not be gravitationally bound). This was in the early 1930s. Father Lemaitre and Albert Einstein toured together to explain this model to other mathematicians, because it is difficult to understand the mathematics behind it.

    Using the mathematical model and better observations of galaxies, a theory was finally developed, and published in 1948. The major difference between a hypothesis and a theory is that the theory makes predictions about what you should be able to measure if you were given better instruments, and - just as important - what you should measure if the theory was wrong. The theory must be "falsifiable" (the author of the theory must provide ways to prove it is wrong).

    In the theory (published 1948), there is no explosion.

    A famous astrophysicist hated the theory because it came from a priest and some people were using it as evidence that the universe was "created" (the astrophysicist was an atheist - he publicly said so himself). He created his own theory (1949) and, during a radio interview, came up with the awful nickname "Big Bang" for the other theory (because everybody had heard about the 1927 description with an explosion but not everyone understood the 1930 mathematical model that removed the explosion).
    The name stuck.
    And for 15 years, most scientists preferred the 1949 theory to the Big Bang theory, mostly because the mathematics were A LOT simpler to understand and, until they got better radio-telescopes, in 1964, it was just as good at explaining what we saw.

    The name Big Bang is unfortunate because many people think that it describes an explosion. It does not.
    Many people (including Father Lemaitre himself) thought that the Big Bang theory describes the creation (or start) of the universe. It does not. It simply describes the evolution of the universe's energy content over the last 13.8 billion years.

    ---

    The "domain" of the theory begins at a moment called the Planck Time (13.8 billion years ago) when the energy density of the universe gets low enough for us to understand how things work.
    At the Planck Time:
    -- the initial energy already existed.
    -- space was already expanding.
    -- the energy density was NOT infinite (no singularity)
    -- matter did not yet exist (the theory does explain how matter forms from the initial energy).

    Therefore, something existed "before", but the Big Bang theory cannot tell us what, since its domain cannot go "before" (in fact, we don't really understand what the word "before" means when applied to the Planck Time).
    There are many ideas, of which roughly eight or nine have some serious scientific foundation.
    It could be that the "driving force" (or a triggering event) is one of those eight or nine... or it could be something else.
    10 answers · Astronomy & Space · 7 hours ago
  • Answer of 6+4+2?

    19 answers · Mathematics · 2 days ago
  • What is 2/3 as a decimal?

    17 answers · Mathematics · 2 days ago
  • Alien life found only 39 light years away?

    Could this be possible?
    Could this be possible?
    25 answers · Astronomy & Space · 4 days ago
  • What is your favorite animal?

    176 answers · Zoology · 7 days ago
  • What would happen if the moon was as big as the sun and vice versa?

    but the same temperature and place as they are now?
    but the same temperature and place as they are now?
    14 answers · Astronomy & Space · 2 days ago
  • If 8 is to 12 what is x is to 36?

    24 answers · Mathematics · 3 days ago
  • Do you know someone who thinks Astrology is a science like Astronomy?

    Is a culture dying when Astrology is rising to the same parity, credibly, as Astronomy within that culture
    Is a culture dying when Astrology is rising to the same parity, credibly, as Astronomy within that culture
    12 answers · Astronomy & Space · 1 day ago
  • Do you think that Earth will remain forever?

    Best answer: I don't know.
    Best answer: I don't know.
    24 answers · Earth Sciences & Geology · 3 days ago